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"Kimagure Orange Road", an immensely successful manga comic feature created by Matsumoto Izumi, ran as a weekly series in the "Shuukan Shoonen Jampu" (Weekly Youth Jump) between 1984 and 1988. The story focuses on love and friendship, with lots of added silliness and slapstick comedy.
Introduction

"Kimagure Orange Road", an immensely successful manga comic feature created by Matsumoto Izumi, ran as a weekly series in the "Shuukan Shoonen Jampu" (Weekly Youth Jump) between 1984 and 1988. The story focuses on love and friendship, with lots of added silliness and slapstick comedy.

Fueled by its success as a published work, top industry professionals were recruited to adapt KOR to television, starting in 1987. All in all, 48 weekly TV episodes (plus a pilot) were produced.

While the stories were only loosely based on the comic version, the style that captured the hearts of millions of Jump readers remained the same. The KOR TV series became one of the most successful anime of the 80's, spawning several OVA's (all available from AnimEigo), CD's, novels and radio programs, as well as a theatrical release, "Ano Hi ni Kaeritai" (I Want To Return To That Day), also known as the "KOR Movie". It continues to attract millions of fans world-wide. Fan-fiction works based on KOR pop up on a regular basis. A sequel to the KOR movie was released in 1996.

AnimEigo is proud to be offering this classic on video and LD. However, without the support (and lots of begging!) of the KOR fan community, this project would never have happened. We would like to take this moment to thank every one of you who wrote to us asking us to release the KOR TV series, except for the 5 of you who threatened to have us all killed if we didn't do it.

About the Title

The word "kimagure" can be rendered several ways in English; it has a meaning similar to "capricious," "whimsical," "unpredictable," etc. In the context of the series, it relates to:

1) The main character's (Kasuga Kyosuke) personality, which is rather indecisive - he often has great trouble making up his mind as to what to do in a given situation. Most of all, he cannot decide who he likes better - Ayukawa Madoka or Hiyama Hikaru.

2) Madoka's mood swings.

"Orange Street" is the name of the street on which "ABCB", a coffee shop, is located. However, it is entirely unclear if this was Mr. Matsumoto's intention or just an after-the-fact addition. Most likely, he just likes the connotations of the word "Orange." Setting

KOR takes place in a fictitious town, somewhere in the Tokyo area.

Japanese Terms of Reference

Unlike English, Japanese employs a number of terms of reference and suffixes that describe the relationship between the speaker and the listener or subject. In our translation, we have left these terms of reference untranslated, or, in the case of suffixes, omitted them. Knowing what they mean, however, can enhance the experience of watching Kimagure Orange Road, so here is a short primer on their use.

Sempai literally means "Senior" and is used to respectfully refer to someone in the same social group as the speaker who is older or more experienced. Thus Hikaru often refers to Kyosuke as "Kasuga-sempai" or just "Sempai" when she is talking about him to other people. The inverse term is "Kohai," or "Junior." Occasionally we will render "XXX-Sempai" as "Sempai XXX" if the usage is particularly respectful as opposed to casual.

-chan is an affectionate suffix that is applied to the names of female acquaintances and also small children; when used between men, it implies a very close relationship. Similarly, -kun is often added to the names of boys. -san is the neutrally-polite suffix, the equivalent of "Mr.", "Mrs." or "Miss." -sama is a very respectful suffix, the equivalent of "Sir." Thus, we often see Hikaru referred to as "Hikaru-chan" by just about everyone, and Madoka usually calls Kyosuke "Kasuga-kun." Note however that because Madoka is using Kyosuke's last name, she's being a bit formal. Kyosuke, for his own part, hasn't had the guts to call Madoka anything other than Ayukawa, and rarely uses the suffixes (we think he's afraid that Madoka will beat him up if he "-chan's" her!). One of the more interesting usage's is that of Master, who often calls Madoka "Madoka-kun," which implies that they are very close, and that she's "one of the boys." Teachers will also often use -kun with everyone, regardless of gender.

When characters change the way they normally refer to someone else, you know some-thing's up. So listen for this.

Oniichan means "Big Brother," and is the common way for younger siblings to refer to their big brother. Oniisan would be a little more polite, of course. Oneechan means "Big Sister," and is also used by small children to refer to young women (who dread the day they stop being Oneechan's and become Obachan's [Aunties]). Imooto and Otooto mean "Little Sister" and "Little Brother." Other common terms include Otoosan (Father), Okaasan (Mother), Ojichan(Uncle), Obaachan (Grandmother) and Ojiichan (Grandfather). When Obaachan becomes Obaasan, you know the kid is wheedling for something!

Master is a common way to refer to the male proprietor of a coffee shop or bar. If he is a she, Mama is used.

Timeline

While the KOR universe in its manga version involved the actual years of 1984 to 1988, the time in which Kyosuke spent his 9th through 12th grade [in manga, as well as in the KOR Movie, Kyosuke was supposedly born on November 15, 1969], the TV version treats it slightly differently. It takes place during the years 1987 to 1988, the same years in which the episodes were actually broadcast. So, to confuse things, the TV Kyosuke was most likely born in 1972. To become more confused, see our Episode Airdates section.

The Birth of "Kimagure Orange Road"

Matsumoto Izumi wrote several short manga features before KOR came along, and they cast some light on how KOR came to be.

In "Live! Tottemo Rock'n'Roll" (Live! Very Rock'n'Roll), 1982, a slapstick comedy about a disorganized rock band, we are introduced to the band's lead vocalist, a fickle-minded girl named "Madoka."

In "Agechau My Heart" ("I'll Give You My Heart"), 1983, he begins to introduce "love comedy" features.

"Panic in Orange Avenue", 1983, became the next major precursor to KOR. In it, a band (named "Orange Avenue") led by one Otomo Hikaru, a girl vocalist with a unisex name, seeks a new guitarist. Hikaru makes a mistake of not saying that her band is an all-girls band. Yokota Yoshimi, a guy who also happens to have a unisex name, ends up joining the band because of a small miscommunication, i.e. Hikaru thought that Yoshimi was a girl, and Yoshimi thought that Hikaru was a guy! Matsumoto says that Orange Avenue's drummer also became the basis for Kurumi in KOR, and KOR's title and characters were much based on PiOA.

Also, in early '84, "Spring Wonder" was created (although it was never finished or published). In SW, a small girl named Hagino Mio is adopted by the Kasuga Family. The Kasuga's have a son named Fuuta, and the two quickly become very close. And when Fuuta and Mio hold hands together, they are able to use special paranormal powers. Matsumoto says that without SW, KOR wouldn't have been possible. The KOR comic series began soon afterwards, in the spring of '84.

The Name's the Thing

Manga creators are known to play around with their character's names. While most characters in KOR have more or less average-sounding Japanese names, there are subtle details which are worth pointing out. Here are just some for the kanji-impaired:

"Kasuga" = "Spring" + "day." "Spring" ("haru") is also poetically equivalent to "youth," and also synonymous to the word "seishun" (which is written using the kanji for "blue" and "spring." "Blue" too can mean "young," poetically in Japanese). "Seishun" can loosely be translated as "the most important time of youth." So a name like this is perfectly suited for someone who introduces himself to us with the phrase: "Kasuga Kyosuke - Seishun shitemasu!" (I, Kasuga Kyosuke, am living the best years of my life!). "Kasuga" also happens to be the name of a celebrated shrine in Nara, Japan.

"Kyosuke" is a common name.

"Ayukawa" = "AYU" + "River" "Ayu" is a species of fish (called 'sweetfish') similar to bass or trout, which makes a pilgrimage each spring, back to the river in which it came from. It is considered the king of freshwater fish.

"Madoka" is homonymous with the word that means 'tranquil.'

"Hiyama" = "HINOKI" + "Mountain" "Hinoki is a kind of cypress tree that is native to Japan. The name "Hinoki" comes from the fact that the tree was originally called "Hi-no-ki", or "Wood/Tree of Fire" because people from the ancient times used this tree to light fire.

"Hikaru" is homonymous with "to shine/light up."

"Hino" = "Fire" + "Field" Note how similar this is to "Hiyama" in many ways. This also emphasizes the closeness of Yuusaku and Hikaru.:

"Yuusaku" is also a common name. Since it uses a kanji character which means "heroic/brave," the name itself does convey a certain sense of strength.

"Umao" = "Horse" + a male name suffix, and "Ushiko" = "Cow" + a female name suffix. These are very uncommon names. Most parents aren't this cruel to their kids.

"Kurumi" is homonymous to "walnut."

More about the Characters

Kasuga Kyosuke

Except for having special "Powers," he is basically an average teenager. However, he is often characterized by his indecisive, somewhat 'wimpy' behavior. The narrative comments he makes are almost always stream-of-consciousness, full of incomplete thoughts and sentence fragments. In fact, certain lines are very ambiguous, sometimes not making any sense, even in the original Japanese.

Kyosuke is the oldest of the Kasuga children. He likes to make commentaries like "What if you become incapable of bearing children?!" There is a reason for this, which will become more clear in the second half of the box set.

Ayukawa Madoka

"Furyoo" refers to juvenile delinquents, the "bad boys and girls," and Madoka supposedly has a definite furyoo background. For more on that, you have to wait for our second set! Just about every school has its furyoo students, the kind seen smoking after school or even dressed like 50's American punks.

The viewers are rarely exposed to Madoka's parents, because they are apparently affiliated with the Chicago Philharmonic Orchestra, and thus spend a considerable amount of time abroad.

According to Mr. Matsumoto, Madoka's physique was inspired by the American actress Phoebe Cates. The anime Madoka was adapted by that illustrator and character designer extraordinaire, Ms. Takada Akemi (whose major anime credits include such classics as "Urusei Yatsura," "Creamy Mami," and "Patlabor.")

Kasuga Takashi

Mr. Kasuga does not have special Powers - they come from his late wife Akemi's side of the family. Akemi's family will appear in future episodes.

Also, Mr. Kasuga, like Mr. Moroboshi in Urusei Yatsura, is almost always seen reading newspapers when he is inside the house. This is actually a stereotype; the head of household being an avid newspaper reader!

Hiyama Hikaru

The name "Hikaru" (homonymous with "to shine/light up") clearly reflects her personality. Not only that, but since "Hikaru" is an unisex name (and this very fact having been exploited in one of Matsumoto's early works), the name cleverly works with her sometimes-tomboyish personality.

Hatta Kazuya & Komatsu Seiji

These are the "hentai," or perverted, friends of Kyosuke, and are actually based on Mr. Matsumoto's real-life associates. A Mr. Komatsu Seiji is a longtime friend, and a Mr. Hatta Kazuya was an assistant who had helped him on the first twelve volumes of the KOR manga series.

Kasuga Kurumi & Kasuga Manami

The twins are two years younger than Kyosuke. Manami is technically the older one, and she acts more "motherly" around the house.

Kurumi seems to be the baby of the family, and she does talk like a baby most of the time. Her famous line, "bun-bun," is a semi-nonsense babytalk. Kurumi was actually based on a character, named Koizumi Chiemi, that Matsumoto created in his early work, "Panic in Orange Avenue."

Master

Master's real name has never been disclosed. In Japan, it is common to refer to a male shopkeeper, especially in a coffee shop or a restaurant, as a "Masutaa" ("Master"), loosely based on a British custom. The female equivalent, by the way, is a "Mama."

Episode Notes

"We're supposed to be human beings, not motorcycles!"

Here Kyosuke actually uses a phrase "nanahan," a nickname for 750cc-class bikes.

"Wherefore art thou Ushiko..." "Wherefore art thou Umao..."

This dialogue, of course, comes from Romeo and Juliet. By the way, Ushiko and Umao's apartment number, "Apt. 102" can be read "ireini," which means "highly unusual."

"...and so, that building over there is the senior high school... ...and, beyond that is the college."

In the series, the junior high-school is a part of the Koryo School. At Koryo, it is said, a student does not have to take difficult entrance exams to advance from junior to senior high school, or from senior high to college. At most schools in Japan, very rigorous entrance exams are administered, so it seems that kids are taking it easy at Koryo. But the truth is that Koryo has much higher standards than most schools, as Madoka shows Kyosuke in a later episode! It should be noted that school systems like Koryo are rare in Japan.

"Interested? She's in Homeroom 'D...'"

Each homeroom has a number followed by a letter. Grade schools run from years 1 to 6, junior high runs from 1 to 3 (7th through 9th grades) and senior high from 1 to 3 (10th through 12th grades). The letters simply divide the grade up into arbitrary sections of roughly equivalent size.

Nosebleeds and Sneezes

A common myth holds that when a teenage boy is highly aroused, he gets a nosebleed. In fact, when a girl is said to be "good enough to make one's nose bleed," it means that she is a knock-out! Another common myth is that coming into contact with water can trigger a cold or the flu, hence Kyosuke starts sneezing just about every time he gets wet!

"A lot of the kids' families are well-to-do; the kids are 'raised in greenhouses.'"

This phrase refers to the fact that many rich families pamper and spoil their children like rare plants in a greenhouse. Koryo School is apparently a very selective establishment, catering to many rich families. Most Japanese magnet schools are like this.

"Bumble-bumble-bumble..."

"Bunbun" is a babytalk referring to the sound of bumblebees or the bees (sometimes beetles) themselves. Kurumi likes to use the phrase to mean "no, no!" but frankly, we liked this rendering (and "Bzzt! Bzzt!" on occasions).

"Well? How's the Tamago-yaki? Was it a bit too sweet?"

Tamago-yaki (or literally "baked egg") is the name given to solid chunks of prepared egg somewhat akin to an omelet. It usually includes sugar, hence the comment.

Bento

Most schools allow students to bring in lunchboxes ("bento") rather than making them eat school-prepared meals. Mothers often compete to produce artistic bento for their children; many books and TV shows are devoted to this ruthless sport.

The Legendary Cutlet Sandwich!

This sandwich is "an inexpensive, tasty, ultimate gourmet delight," and consists of fried pork, shredded lettuce, and various condiments. It should be noted that most schools do not have lunchtime pastry dealers such as the ones we see in KOR, however some magnet schools that became famous during the 80's publicized such luxury features as gourmet menu, designer uniforms, etc.

"All right, let's go for it! It's 'Cheek Time!'"

"Cheek Time" refers to "slow dancing," for obvious reasons. Trivia: In the script, the DJ is named "DJ Catman."

"Hikaru?! A Sensational C-Experience."

"C-Taiken," or "C" Experience, refers to "sex," based on 3 levels of "Taiken," originally published by a teenage magazine during the early 80's. They are: "A" = Kissing. "B" = Petting. "C" = Sex. Furthermore, sometimes "D" is added to mean "pregnancy." If you look at the shape of the letter, you'll understand why!

Egg-sake

Older generations often relied on this cold remedy made of egg yolk and sake. It is almost never administered among the young!

"It's true that she came over to my house but we were only chatting and drinking coffee!"

"Ocha wo nomu" is a phrase that literally means "to drink tea." It should be noted that the phrase in its most common usage does not refer specifically to tea-drinking; it could refer to anything from drinking any type of beverage (in this case, coffee) to just simply "chilling out."

"Oniichan, we got a souvenir for you! Look!"

This souvenir from Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan, is a wooden sculpture of a bear.

"...we'll only be tested on stuff up to Dazai Osamu's short story on pg. 28, right?"

"Dazai" refers to Dazai Osamu (1909-1948; real name "Tsushima Shuuji"), a novelist widely considered to be one of the most important post-WW2 writers, but since it sounds like "dasai," which is a colloquial phrase meaning "uncool" or "lame," it works as a pun.

"Actually, I was near the bottom of the top third at my previous school!"

It is common to refer to class rank in terms of "jou" (upper third), "chuu" (middle) and "ge" (lower third), rather than any specific number.

"The square root of 3 is 1.7320508..."

Japanese students often rely on mnemonics to memorize terms such as these, which they are expected to know.

1.7320508 = hi(1)-to(.)-na(7)-mi(3)-ni(2)-o(0)-go(5)-re(0)-ya(8)

It so happens that the phrase "hitonominiogoreya" sounds like a sentence: "go treat people..." (as in drinks etc.)

"Use an 'oar' to 'swiftly' cross the river" - Relative pronouns.

"oar" in Japanese ("ooru") and "all" are homonyms. Similarly "swiftly" ("zatto") and "that."

"The Lord of Soga Clan cries like a baby; 'tis 645 AD - The Taika Reforms."

645 AD was the year the Taika Reforms were introduced. Here the mnemonic is based on "(naki)mushi-gou(kyuu)," where: "mu" is another reading for "6," "shi" for "4," and "gou" for "5," hence "to cry loud, as in like a baby."

"Oh! Is that from Mr. Fried Chicken?"

A made-up fried-chicken joint, obviously based on Kentucky Fried Chicken. Japanese KFC joints actually do have statues of the Colonel at the entrance.

"Exams should be taken without using special powers. That's been the rule in the Kasuga Family for generations."

Actually, since Mr. Kasuga does not have any special Powers, he is actually referring to his wife's side of the family. It is not uncommon to refer to the wife's side as one's own, as he does here.

"Concentration..." and "concentric plug"

"Consento" is the Japanese word for a wall socket.

"ABCB"

This ordinary, very typical "kissaten," or a "coffee shop," is located on a street named "Orange Road." "ABCB" is pronounced "Abakabu" or "Abacab," based on title of the album "Abacab" by Genesis.

"All rise! Bow!"

Classes usually begin or end with this greeting. "Kiritsu" means "All rise," "Rei" means "Bow." They are followed by "Chakuseki," which means "to be seated," if the class is to begin, or "Kaisan" if the class is over.

"Drinking alcohol isn't that great of a thing, it seems."

The legal drinking age in Japan is 20.

"Yeah! 'Fickle-Minded Angel Humming Amidst the Flowers!'"

This is a reference to a girls' comic character who was always surrounded by flowers, singing and humming.

"'Sacrifice for what is important,' as the saying goes. "

The actual phrase is "Se ni hara wa kaerarenu," literally "the stomach can't replace the back." It is a saying that comes from a popular card game from the Edo period. Figuratively, the phrase means that sometimes one has to sacrifice something in order to deal with what is urgent.

"Her expressions. They change as fast as the eyes of a cat!"

"Neko no me no yoo" ("like the eyes of a cat") is a figurative phrase which means that something can change and adapt to any given situation. The saying comes from the fact that it is easy to see how a cat's eyes instantaneously react to the amount of light that is available.

"Young man! What's the meaning of this?! I don't want my merchandise played around with!"

Typical electric appliance stores in metropolitan areas have merchandise on display in front of the shop.

"Good afternoon." - Madoka

The fact that Madoka greets Master by saying "Ohayou," usually rendered as "Good morning," should not be considered exactly that. It is not uncommon to use "ohayou" even in the afternoon.

In fact, many anime professionals greet each other by saying "ohayou" any time of day. This is probably because they work such long and irregular hours that they never know what time of day it is.

"You can't stop me!" - Kyosuke "Don't kill yourself so soon!" - Hatta

In this scene, Hatta mistakenly assumes that Kyosuke is trying to jump out of the window to kill himself. In fact, there were many incidents in which students committed suicide this way.

"You scum should eat green-pea pastry!"

"Uguisu Pan" (or "Nightingale Bread") is the affectionate name given to a type of pastry which has anko (see below) made of green beans. One can get this basically anywhere.

"Here you go! Thank you very much. It'll be 1,250, sir." "Sheesh! Why should I have to pay for Yuusaku as well?!"

At the time of the broadcast, $1 was approximately 143 Yen (and at the rate things are going, it'll soon be at that rate again. Coincidence? We think not...) So a meal for three at that price was very reasonable.

Don't Ring the Wedding Bell!

We shall not mention the obvious and hilarious parody of "The Graduate." Ooops...

"...and so, you may find it hard to believe, but Japan and America were at war early in the Showa era."

The Showa ("Enlightened Peace") Era/Period refers to the years between 1926 and 1989.

"...th... the TILES?" - Kyosuke

The actual sentence that Kyosuke was supposed to read was written: "From the ancient times to the distant future Japan was and will be a marine nation..." One of the kanji characters (a verb) resembled that of "tile(s)," and Kyosuke misreads it.

"I wonder if the schools there have such a thing as 'Parents Visitation Day?'"

Japanese schools regularly host "Parents Visitation Days," allowing mom and dad to witness their children "at work." Children know it as the "day their teachers act nice."

"...that bitchy tease, loosens up a little in America!"

It is a common myth among the Japanese that they "loosen up" and lose some moral values upon spending considerable time abroad. This is based on stories that many "kikoku shijo," Japanese children who came back after spending some years in America, lacked the kind of rigorous moral standards and attitudes that the 'normal' Japanese children were taught.

"Er... Er... my mama was saying that you'll get tired of western food if that's all you're having, so she said she'd make some stewed daikon radishes for you." - Yuusaku

Daikon are a big long radish used in traditional Japanese dishes. Yuusaku and his mother are under the impression that Japanese won't make it on western foods alone.

"OK, then! 'For what we are about to receive!'"

"Itadakimasu" is a kind of prayer said before meals. It is meant to not only thank those who prepared the meals, but also everyone who was responsible (farmers, etc.) in making the ingredients and materials. The after-meal prayer is "Gochisoosama."

"Hikaru's made a debut, in Jr. High! Maybe I should try it too!"

This is in reference to the myriad of top idol-stars of the 80's who became overnight sensations. They were often labeled as "average junior/senior high school students" without much exceptional talents but were made celebrities because of their looks or personalities.

"Wanna drink?"

Viewers might note how most beverage cans in anime are so skinny. In Japan, this size (250 ml or approximately 8 oz) is a standard.

"Does she think it's OK to come to school wearing those clothes?!"

Most junior and senior high schools in Japan have strict dress codes. The uniforms such as those in KOR are the most traditional ones: boys are outfitted with fairly tight-fitting, dark (usually black, sometimes navy) suits, while girls wear the so-called "seiraa-fuku" ("sailor dress"). Some schools also require hats to be worn, others might require boys to shave their heads or girls to keep their hair within a certain length. Note that the "furyoo" ("delinquent") students are typically seen wearing oversized or unbuttoned uniforms --- e.g., guys with 50's greased hairdo wearing sunglasses and pants several sizes too big are most likely furyoo or a member of some gang!

To address dress code and other related issues that were frowned upon by most students, many magnet schools that popped up during the 80's offered such alternatives as uniforms designed by top fashion moguls. While grade schools and colleges generally have no dress code, it is very rare to find junior or senior high schools that do not employ them!

"Hatta's Melon-Bread... It's got an Oh-So-Cutesy texture... It's exceptional!"

"Melon Pan" is a typical snack food, a round piece of pastry with a somewhat moist outer coating. They retail for about 100 Yen each. While some actually incorporate cantaloupe extracts, most do not, because melon products (and melons themselves) are outrageously expensive in Japan.

"Pako" is a semi-nonsense 'word' which is sometimes used as a babytalk to mean "to munch," but in most cases it has not much meaning beyond its 'cute sounding' function.

"With contemporary trends in mind..." - Kurumi

Kurumi is talking like a typical fashion show MC. Also in this sequence, what Jingoro ends up looking like is a cross between some of the most famous pro-wrestlers and pet celebrities of the day.

"How dare you... when you're still in Jr. High! You'd better be accepting responsibility for this!" - Yuusaku

In this scene, Yuusaku thinks that Kyosuke had made Hikaru pregnant. In the 80's, there were many teenage TV dramas that dealt with this theme, and what Yuusaku says here are very stock lines from such shows.

"You're such a coward... you're the worst! We can't... We can't see each other anymore!"

The Tanabata festival is celebrated on July 7th. It is based on a Chinese legend of "Prince Hikoboshi" (also known as "Kengyuu" or a herdsman, represented by the constellation Altair) and "Princess Orihime" ("Weaving girl/princess," constellation Lyra) [note that there are many readings of these two figures]. The two constellations seem to come together on that night in the sky. The story goes that Orihime's father, the master of the heavens, allowed the two to see each other only once a year on the 7th day of the 7th lunar month.

On this day, people make wishes on pieces of paper that are hung on trees somewhat like Christmas decorations.

Visual Joke: When Madoka and Kyosuke are alone, you can see some wish-tags that contain messages such as "Kane ga hoshii" ("I want money"), "Hoshii Hoshii Hoshii" ("I want it! I want it! I want it!"), and "Onna hoshii" ("I want women"). They were added by some of the staff animators.

"Strong! The Era of Women Has Arrived New Female Pro Wrestlers."

Female professional wrestlers became instant celebrities in the late 70's. The "Beauty Pair" tag-team, for example, was an inspiration for "Dirty Pair," the anime characters who first made their debut in "Crusher Joe." The 80's saw many female wrestler celebrities, who were often seen more on TV variety shows (sitcoms, quiz shows, etc.) than in the ring.

"Right? "Rikidozan!" - Kasuga Takashi

Rikidozan was a celebrated sumo wrestler who traveled to United States to study professional wrestling. He became an wrestling superstar in the 50's.

"I promise I'll support you!" - Komatsu "I'll be your groupie!" - Hatta

Basically, another idol-star reference. Like every sport team, every idol star always had at least one "Ooendan" (Cheerleading Squad). Unlike American cheerleaders, ooendan usually consist of men.

"Allow me to be an idol star for a moment!"

"Oh, my love will ride the southern wind. Oh, the Blue Wind... come hither, then go run onto the island..." - Hikaru

An idol-star reference. The words actually come from a song by one of the biggest idol-stars of the 80's, Matsuda Seiko, who also released records in the US under the name of "Seiko." The song titled "Aoi Sangoshoo" (Blue Coral Reef) was her debut single in 1980, which made her an instant superstar, and is a standard karaoke classic. Hikaru's hairstyle is actually based on a famous one Seiko had during the early part of the 80's (and was imitated by girls all over Japan). During that period, which its survivors would love to forget, all the idol-stars had pretty much the same hairdo.

"I said, it's upside-down!" - Hikaru "Well, I was just thinking that it'd be more artistic upside-down!" - Kyosuke

Art aficionados will recognize this as a reference to Georg Baselitz, one of the fathers of the German Neo-Expressionists, who became an international sensation in the early 80's with his 'upside down' paintings. We told you these liner notes are educational.

"Will you swear it to 'Hell's Judge?'"

"Enma-Sama" refers to an entity in Buddhism. According to legend, Enma was once a divine figure in the heavens who judged souls upon their entering the realm of the afterlife, but eventually became the judge of hell.

"...the 'UFO' was flown by Kurumi."

In Japan, "UFO" is virtually synonymous with "spaceship", so UFO's are actually "identified flying objects!"

"Our agile camerawork! Our high-energy curiosity! And the shameless resolve to barge into other people's business! With these three talents in harmony, we make excellent reporters!" - Hatta and Komatsu

In presenting a material or product, the typical sales pitch harps on it's three most desirable features in order to convince the target audience. "Sanbyooshi sorotte!" or "three features in perfect harmony!," the pitch usually goes. In other words, Hatta and Komatsu are attempting to blatantly promote themselves in this scene.

"What?! Yuusaku, you don't believe in the existence of UFO's?! And, you claim to be a Newtype?!"

During the mid-80's, a political commentator came up with a term "shinjinrui," which could be rendered "New Generation/Type/Human Race/Species." Similar to the label "Generation X," it referred to young people who grew up during the Bubble Economy Era Japan, who were engrossed in lifestyles of overspending and extravagance that "their elders find so bizarre as to suggest another species." (Joseph J. Tobin, "Re-Made in Japan," Yale Univ. Press, 1992) Often, these young adults would be obsessed with expensive collecting (often of useless objects) and other hobbies which were looked down upon by their elders. Anime Otaku would, of course, be a particularly reprehensible subspecies of shinjinrui.

What Hikaru meant here, and how Yuusaku reacted, work as a pun. Yuusaku thinks that Hikaru actually meant that he was not a human being! And finally, to make the pun more bizarre, we couldn't resist turning it into a reference to a certain other anime series!

"Get lots of exercise, take care not to have any accidents and make your summer vacation a meaningful experience." - Principal

In just about every school that has an assembly ground, the principal speaks to the students on a regular basis, as in this scene. It is in fact a too-typical scene. This speech here also is a stock one.

"All right! Let's step on it! Okutama or bust!"

Okutama is a tourist resort in western Tokyo.

"The summer break that we've long waited for has finally arrived. Still... with all this homework that I have to do..."

It goes without saying that Japanese school systems are among the most rigorous in the world. Virtually all schools send their students off to their brief summer vacation loaded down with obscene amounts of homework to do. Many require diaries and daily problem sets to be completed.

"Hatta's oil is Super Ultra-Special Premium High-Grade Delicious stuff! Right?"

Hatta is using cooking oil here, the kind that's used to fry tempura.

"You idiot! You got almost half of them wrong!" - Madoka

Here, Madoka is imitating a mean, male teacher.

"Madoka's Challenge! The Haunted Beach's Big Wave Legend."

The original script called for "Big Wednesday" but it was changed to "Big Monday" sometime during the production! "Big Wednesday" was the name of a surfing movie by John Milius, produced in 1978. It is also known as "Summer of Innocence."

"Yeah, supposedly she's a stunning beauty... Her name is Koto, it's said."

While it was common for women to be named "Koto" in the past generations, it rarely occurs in the modern times. Hence the impact of the name it had on the characters. "Koto" is also the name of a stringed instrument, somewhat like a zither.

"If I eat any more, I'll turn into a mermaid!"

One mermaid legend says that if a person eats mermaid flesh, they can gain immortality. Another legend has it that if a person overeats fish, they will become a mermaid. There are countless such legends, and this scene is just based on one of them.

"I remember seeing a movie long ago... about a young couple, stranded on a deserted island just like we were."

This is either a reference to the famous Hollywood movie "The Blue Lagoon," the 1980 film with Brooke Shields, or its knockoff, "Paradise," from 1982, which featured Phoebe Cates (whose figure, as was mentioned previously, was the inspiration for Madoka's). Although the reference in the episode isn't clear, Kyosuke is thinking of the latter film.

"That was the so-called 'Contact Kiss.'"

A "Kansetsu Kisu" ("Contact Kiss") is said to occur when one shares the same bottle of drink, same utensils, etc. It is basically a term invented by teenagers who have yet to experience the real thing.

"Where two prefectures meet, a river runs through it."

The book Kyosuke reads on the train is titled "Ryoshu" (Loneliness While On A Journey).

"At our private school, you can slide like pasta from junior high to college..."

"Tokoroten-shiki" refers to a system in which something can progress without much effort, as in Kyosuke's school, where junior high students can continue on to senior high and college without taking rigorous entrance exams. The term comes from how "tokoroten," a gelatin, is served; you push a mold without much force, and it comes out easily like pasta.

"Looks like we'll be doing things in our assigned classes."

"Doing things in assigned classes" is a very typical way in which outdoor school events like the one in this story are done.

Kitakata is not a teacher, but most likely a college student at the Koryo School. His favorite word: "utsukushii" or "beautiful."

"Kyosuke in a Pinch. Sweet Nothings at the Wuthering Heights."

"Arashigaoka," which literally means "Stormy Hill," is actually the Japanese title of Bronte's classic work, "Wuthering Heights."

"Ooohhh! I can't hold back anymore! Here I go..." - Hatta
"D...Dumb-ass! If you can't hold it... then go to the bathroom NOW!" - Komatsu
"Ow! To the bathroom... Here I go!" - Hatta

This sequence revolves around a rather risqu (we're talking about Komatsu and Hatta, after all!) pun on the phrase "icchau." It is homonymous to various "icchau" as in:

1) "I'm gonna say it"

2) "I'm gonna go somewhere"

3) "I'm gonna achieve (something dirty)" (ex. "I'm gonna wet my pants")

The first time Hatta says the phrase, he meant "I'm gonna say it!" Komatsu quickly tries to persuade Hatta to do otherwise, and make it sound as if Hatta was actually saying "I'm gonna wet my pants!" On the last "icchau," Hatta changes the meaning to "I'm gonna go to the bathroom!" This is also a dirty pun because "icchau" is used by adults to mean "achieve an orgasm."

"After thinking about it I thought of having a 'summer experience' at that moment."

"Hitonatsu shichau," or "gonna have one experience of the summer," is basically a euphemism for losing one's virginity, with a slight poetic flavor to it.

"Thunder! I can't stand thunder!" - Komatsu
"Oh! I don't want my bellybutton to be taken away!" - Hatta

Japanese children are taught at a very young age that Oni are creatures that live on top of the clouds. When the Oni are upset, they create thunder and lightning, and go after children's bellybuttons. Obviously, Komatsu and Hatta still believe in this children's story. For more details on the Oni, see the Urusei Yatsura Liner notes.

"Damn! You know, he could be doing the old 'meow-meow' with her!" - Komatsu
"Here. 'Meow-meow.'" - Hatta
"Geez! What exactly is inside your head?!" - Komatsu

"Nyan nyan" is a babytalk for "a cat," and also onomatopoeic for meowing. Adults also use it to refer to "an intimate act." In this sequence, Komatsu meant just that, that he theorized that Kyosuke and Kumiko were "doing it," and assumed that Hatta knew what he meant. However, Hatta didn't recognize the meaning of the phrase.

"Let's pray for the spirits again next year." - Madoka "Go on... in my place..." - Oda Kumiko "As she set a lantern afloat I knew... I knew that the operation would be successful." - Kyosuke

Bon Ceremonies, which have Buddhist origins in China, are held in mid-August. It is believed that spirits of ancestors make a visit home during the beginning of the Bon Ceremonies. Prayers are offered, and by sending small 'boats' (basically small paper lanterns) down a river (this act is called "Shouryou Nagashi," or "Tourou Nagashi"), the spirits are honorably 'sent back.' For many people, these ceremonies do not necessarily have religious meaning per se, but are significant as a time of family gathering and well-wishing.

"Like the Salvia Flower that stands against the cold breeze, I want to grow by your side."

The red ribbon that Yukari wraps around Madoka and Kyosuke seems very trivial to westerners, but it actually represents a very important Japanese legend. It is said that two people tied by a red thread are destined to spend the rest of their lives together as lovers. This motif also appeared in one of the Urusei Yatsura Movies.

In real-life, the words to the song were written by Yukawa Reiko, who is one of the greatest songwriters in Japanese pop music history. It should be noted that, unlike most anime songs, virtually all the songs in KOR were written as normal pop tunes by hitmakers such as Ms. Yukawa and Urino Masao, whose songs dominated the charts throughout the 80's and 90's. "Night of Summer Side," for example, was a top-10 hit for Ikeda Masanori, then an idol-singer (currently one of the top daytime TV stars).

"Look where he's hiding!" - Yuusaku "You called?!" - a man

The man trying out a T-shirt (whose logo reads "Tonton the Panda") is drawn to look like a cross between a very generic yakuza gangster and a truck driver.

"We'd like to decide who will get to be our sacrificial lambs. Does anyone have a suggestion as to who to choose?"

Class polls like this are often conducted by a student 'leader.'

"Yes, the way he bites into a sandwich... it looks just like the Igangaa!" - Komatsu
"I believe that kind of thinking is... Ikangaa." - Hatta

"Igangaa" is based on "Gangaa" from "Astro Gangaa," a robot anime series from the 70's. The pun works like this: Igangaa -> Ikangaa, where "Ikan" means "not good" in Osaka dialect, which makes it sound like "It ain't good."

"Try running it by me again, I'm tellin' ya! Looks like I gotta beat the crap outta you to make you understand." - Kyosuke

In this sequence, Kyosuke is talking like a stereotypical gangster or even a samurai, in a very mean manner. (At the same time, Madoka answers like a stereotypical, submissive wife of a samurai!)

"Mountain." - Komatsu "River." - Hatta

This sequence in which the words "Mountain" and "River" are exchanged refers to the most basic greeting that was used among soldiers and spies throughout Japanese history.

"You'll be running 'fast,' without any hard training at all! I wish I could've told Seko or the Sou Brothers about it too, man!"

The Sou Brothers and Seko were three of the best marathon runners in the late 70's and early 80's. They became celebrities that today's marathon runners, amateurs and professionals alike, look up to.

"Free Anko... Psych! Just kidding."

"Anko" is a snack food made of red beans, sugar and some salt. It has a paste-like consistency of peanut-butter, and is usually very sweet. Often served on top of ice cream, or inside of a pastry as in "an-pan" (which is a nickname for "anko-pan" or "anko bread").

"Starting tomorrow, I'm gonna be making him special 'stamina lunches'..."

"Stamina Meals" refer to any foods which are known to boost energy, usually because of high carbohydrates, sugars and nutrition. Gatorade, for example, is considered a "stamina drink."

"By the time he learned to crawl, he was in intensive training..."

"Omoikondara shiren no michi wo..." These words are from the theme song to "Kyojin no Hoshi" (loosely translatable as "The Star of Giants"), an anime series from the 70's. The title (which in itself is a pun on many levels) refers to the 'star' of the Tokyo Giants (the famed baseball team), Hoshi (Star) Hyuuma, who was forced to become a baseball star by his father. Since his early childhood, Hyuuma was involved in intensive training on a daily basis.

"Kyojin no Hoshi" became such a successful show that it became a part of contemporary Japanese society, so much so that any father who forces his son to be in some kind of training could be (with a twist of humor) referred to as a "Mr. Hoshi." Ryuu-nosuke and her father in "Urusei Yatsura," for instance, are a classic example.

This sequence is particularly funny if you happen to know that the voice of Kasuga Kyosuke, Furuya Tooru, also provided the voice of Hoshi Hyuuma in "Star of the Giants," while still a teenager!

"That person's name is written with three characters... It begins with 'Hi-' and ends in '-ru.'"

Hikaru's name is not written with any kanji characters. It is written using three hiragana characters: "hi," "ka" and "ru."

"There's no way you can run fast with those bowlegs of yours!"

"Ganimata" (literally "Crab Thighs," sometimes called "'O'-Kyaku" or "'O'-Legged," Bowleg) occurs when legs grow slightly outward, causing a pronounced gap to develop between the knees. It is not considered aesthetically pleasing, and often made fun of. People with bowlegs are sometimes called "'O'-Legged" because the legs form an "O" like silhouette. The opposite of this is called "'X'-Kyaku."

Some male characters in anime are bowlegged if just for added sense of humor. They might be seen running with bowlegs, for instance.

On a personal note, Robert contends that this comment of Hikaru's is just another example of why she must die.

"It must mean that I've developed telepathic ability... Banzai!"

"Banzai" is a phrase that literally means "Prosper For Ever!", and most Americans know of it only as a war-cry used by Japanese troops in WW2 movies. However, these days it is used colloquially to express a feeling of great excitement. We felt it best to leave it untranslated.

Thus, upon receiving this KOR TV set, if you were a true Otaku, you would have shouted "Banzai!" too! You did, didn't you?

..."Oh, gosh! He makes me so mad!" - Kurumi
"Hello there. Thank you for waiting." - Kyosuke

After he hypnotizes himself, Kyosuke starts talking in a distinctly more formal and seemingly over-dramatic manner. The following examples go a few steps further.

"Days like this make me want to shout at the blue sky with all my might!" - Kyosuke
"Maybe the summer heat has finally penetrated and cooked his brain!" - Hatta

"If you're a man, then be straight-forward! Deal with it head on! Isn't that what it means to be young?! Isn't that what our youthful days are all about?!" - Kyosuke
"Talk about corny! His brain DID get cooked by the summer heat!" - Hatta

The phrases he uses come from teenage TV shows and movies from the decades past, when such themes were the raison d'etre for young adults throughout Japan. These days, however, most teenagers find such dialogues rather laughable.

"Got a minute?" - Madoka "What is it, Ayukawa-kun?" - Kyosuke
"'-kun?!'" - Madoka

Here, Kyosuke (still under hypnosis) is addressing Madoka by using "-kun," an honorific commonly used by fellow colleagues, or by teachers to address students. It's also generally used to address boys.

Among friends, for instance, "-kun" is only used to address males, as in "Kasuga-kun."

Using "-kun" to address women is generally left to male (and often much older) teachers and supervisors who would otherwise refer to them without using any honorific. There is a sense of distance when this form of addressing is used, hence Madoka's surprised reaction in this sequence.

"Breakin' Heart... Kiss me, 'til the morning comes..."

The song is performed by Tsubokura Yuiko, a top singer whose voice can be heard just about everywhere.

In the early 80's, Ms. Tsubokura was an A-list background singer who recorded with a veritable Who's Who of the Japanese pop music industry. Her solo projects from the mid 80's to early 90's included many anime songs (including an opening song for the KOR OAV's), and during the past several years, soundtracks for TV dramas. She was most recently featured in the Japanese production of the Broadway hit "Rent."

As a disguised member of the group "The B.B.Queens," she sang one of the most successful anime tunes of all time - "Odoru Ponpokorin" (from the show "Chibi Maruko-Chan") - for which the group picked up the prestigious Record Taishou (the Japanese equivalent of a Grammy).

"Hey, come on! What's the idea?"
"What do you mean?"
"You've wanted to see this movie, haven't you?"

This sequence is a parody of "American Graffiti" - Here, they call it "American Variety."

The poster says: Directed by Shooji Kiidesu -- Starring Ochaadoo Doreidesu

These names are plays on Jooji Ruukasu (George Lucas) and Richaado Doreifasu (Richard Dreyfus), respectively, and the phrase "Shooji Kiidesu" was made up to sound like "shoojikidesu," which means "I don't lie!"

Another movie poster showing a mother embracing her child is a play on the film, "Jiroo Monogatari" (Story of Jiroo), which was one of the box office hits of 1987. Here, it is spoofed as "Shiroo Monogatari."

"If ya ever see her... tell that bitch that Yoko from Minato-ku wants to pay her back." - Yoko

Furyoo, Sukeban and other bad Apples: "Furyoo" refers to high school delinquents and hoodlums who usually hang out in groups - not a very friendly bunch! Larger groups can become extremely territorial, often leading to deadly fights among neighboring groups.

Furyoo kids are often seen wearing oversized or unbuttoned school uniforms, with men sometimes sporting greased hairstyles reminiscent of the 60's USA! Others may look like anything from young yakuza members to punk rockers.

Furyoo girls are often referred to as "sukeban" or "suke" for short. At one time, Madoka apparently belonged to one such group.

"Yoko from Minato"

One of the classic Japanese pop tunes is "Minato no Yoko," a song about a furyoo girl named Yoko whose hangout was the Port ("Minato") of Yokosuka. (Ports such as Yokosuka were occupied by US officers after WWII, so a lot of Japanese living nearby had access to things American - rock&roll, jeans, bikes, leather jackets, etc. - In fact, that's how such goods were first imported!)

The song was performed by a "furyoo rock" group called "The Downtown Boogie-Woogie Band" in the 70's. Their leader, Uzaki Ryuudou, is a noted composer, having written hundreds of hit songs and scored such films as "Dagger of Kamui."

"Minato" is also the name of a district in Tokyo, thus "Yoko of Minato" not only works as a pun but pays tribute to the classic tune as well!

"S...Seems everybody's got it all wrong! Gosh, they sure put me in an awkward position!" - Kyosuke

The following scene was cut from the final version, just after this line:

Yuusaku (furious, and grabs Kyosuke by the chest): Yo! What's the idea, man! So this is why you wanted me to go to the hospital, eh?! How dare you use Madoka's injury as an excuse!

Kyosuke: N... Y... You've got it all wrong! I can explain!

Yuusaku: Excuse, eh?!

Komatsu (holding a camera): Hmmm! So energetic! Good! Good! And then, raise your fist a little further up... Then, knock him down, and then...

Yuusaku (seen through the viewfinder, close-up): Why, you... What do you think you're filming!!

Komatsu: Holy...!!

Hatta: Cut!! Not good!!

Komatsu (trying to calm everybody down): Don't you see, that enraged expression on your face... Now, there's the reason why Hikaru doesn't like you.

Yuusaku: Huh?!

Hatta: It's VERY obvious when seen through the lens...

Yuusaku: O...Oh!

Komatsu: Well, we'll teach you well! You know, what you've gotta do in order to be well-liked by girls... I mean, we wrote the book on its theory!

Hatta: ...though, as for the application...

Yuusaku: O...Oh!

"Here's your dinner: Udon-noodles! Enjoy them while they're hot, OK?" - Hikaru

Udon is the name given to thick buckwheat noodles, almost always served hot in a bowl containing soup-broth.

"I understand that you saved our Linda from being run over by a truck... Miss, it seems I've caused you trouble by leaving Linda with my kid brother." - Yoko

The body gesture seen here is a greeting of a very respectful kind - but one from samurai-era Japan!

"Lemmesee here... Huh?! What the heck is this?! Huh?! Oh?!" - Komatsu
"Permit me to contact her before you do!" - Hatta

Here, Hatta hands over a booklet showing what the script calls "Kaijin caado" or photo collection of "kaijin" (monsters/creatures). These monsters were made up for this scene (the names are actually puns):

Sameraa - (Same = shark)
Hanbaraa - (Hanba = from "Hanbaagaa" or Hamburger)
Nazoraa - (Nazo = mystery, hence the question mark)
Biidamaraa - (Biidama = glass marble)

"-raa" is a common suffix that's used for monster names. (Remember, Toho pioneered the monster-movie industry!)

"'3 frogs and 3 frogs' 'All together... 6 frogs'" "'The guest from next-door is a guest who likes to eat persimmons a lot!'" - Kyosuke

Here, Kyosuke tries out a couple of standard tongue-twisters.

The first one should be: "Kaeru pyokopyoko mi-pyokopyoko. Awasete pyokopyoko mu-pyokopyoko." ("Pyoko" can be thought as an onomatopia for a frog popping up.)

...but Kyosuke mangles it badly, and says: "Kaeru byogobyogo mi-byogobyogo. Awasete byogobyogo mu-byogobyogo"

Similarly, the second one should be: "Tonari no kyaku wa yoku kaki kuu kyaku da."

...but Kyosuke says: "Donari no gyagu wa yogu kaki kuu gyagu da."

All viewers of the KOR set may not watch any subsequent episodes until after they have mastered these tongue-twisters.

"You won't believe your eyes; Oniichan's got a real surprise for you!" - Kurumi

Here, Kurumi says the following phrase: "Odoroki momo no ki dokkidoki!"

This comes from an old saying, "Odoroki momo no ki sansho no ki," which is half-nonsense purely relying on a form of rhyming (using "ki") of the words "Odoroki"(Surprise), "Momo no ki"(Peach tree) and "Sansho no ki" (a kind of a pepper tree). The phrase is used to express a feeling of surprise or shock.

Kurumi's version is slightly different. "Dokkidoki" is a very colloquial term, based on onomatopia for heart pounding!

"Don't Cry Jingoro! The Heat of Young Love."
"Look, you, don't you know that puberty and the estrus cycle are when we've got to fight using reason!" - Komatsu

To be precise, the Japanese phrase used in the title ("Hatsujooki") is technically known as the estrus cycle. In its colloquial usage - it's used more often in everyday Japanese than in English - it can mean puberty (which actually refers to a slightly different thing) or anything similar.

For our translation of the title, we chose the colloquial approach. Komatsu's line is slightly more technical, so our rendering takes this into account.

"Anju! Zushio!" "Mother!" - Kyosuke

These names come from a play called "Sansho Dayu," or "Sansho the Bailiff." Anju and Zushio are two children who are sold into slavery to the bailiff after their mother had been sold into prostitution. The story is about the children's quest to find their mother.

"Still, tell me what happened? Your cutesy eyes are all red." - Hikaru
"Oh! Well... Nothing much, really." - Kyosuke

The phrase Hikaru uses to refer to Kyosuke's eyes is actually half babytalk!

"'When you meet someone for the first time sometimes love blooms, starting that very day! The stranger that you are and the stranger that you are...'" "We'll set you up on a date..." "Meow-Meow With A Punch!" - Komatsu and Hatta

There are a plentiful of matchmaking shows on Japanese TV, and here our favorite perferts parody them. The lines are pretty much stock.

"I'm your host, Komatsuya Iwashi!" "I'm the assistant host, Hattatei Buri!" - Komatsu and Hatta

The made-up names here are based on the fact that the given name of Akashiya Sanma, a famous comedian, is the name of a fish ("Sanma" = mackerel pike). A lot of comedians have "-ya" or "-tei" in their 'family' names, as they serve apprenticeships to a master, whose name they adopt.

"Iwashi" means sardine, and "Buri" means yellowtail. The latter is especially comedic, since it's also an onomatopeia for flatulence!

"A Tender Little Story! Kurumi's First Love - Chapter 'Hell'"

Colloquially, the Japanese title, "Konoha Monogatari," refers to short love stories but it can literally mean "a story of (fallen) leaves of a tree." Notice how and how much leaves appear symbolically in this episode.

"Hi, Kasuga! Got a moment?" - Komatsu
"What do you want?! You're grossing me out!" - Kyosuke

The phrase "Uffuuun!" that's heard here is not a real word. Komatsu is imitating a woman laughing in a sensual manner.

"'You shampooed your hair this morning! Sure smells nice!'" - Komatsu
"'Oh! Coach!'" - a girl

Sometimes little things, as bizarre as they are, become extremely trendy. "Asa-shan" (shampooing hair before going to school) or "Morning Shampoo" was a fad in the early 80's!

"Lady Hikaru! I, Yuusaku, have brought that which you sought!" - Yuusaku
"What's with this?! I asked you to bring me a coffee-milk!" - Hikaru
"B...But, it was sold out... Fruit juice is good too, I'm sure..." - Yuusaku

The two kinds of milk offered in schools are regular milk and coffee-milk. In Japan, coffee-milk is as common as chocolate-milk is in the US.

"D...D...Don't you... like s... s... s... Don't you like sukiyaki?!" - Manami

The pun here relies on "suki" (to like/love, etc.) and "sukiyaki" (cooked beef in broth). Manami wanted to ask if Hayami has someone special, or 'likes someone else' already.

"Good-bye, Kurumi! I'll write you, once I get settled!" - Hayami

Notice the red tape. Longtime readers of our liner notes will already know the symbolic meaning of a red thread.

"K...Kasuga! Have you heard?! Yuusaku confessed his love for Ayukawa!" - Komatsu

Often in anime, this topic may appear overly dramatic to westerners, but love confessions ("kokuhaku") are a big thing for Japanese teens, so much so that kids take them extremely seriously!

"Just because Yuusaku and I were childhood chums, he's been pestering and bugging me like some annoying housefly!" - Hikaru

The onomatopeia ("Buuun!") voiced by Yuusaku here is generally used to describe things that fly - airplanes, insects, etc. - Akin to how "Bzzz" is used in English.

"A dog?! A pig?! A raccoon?! Just what in the hell are you?!" - Kyosuke

What we rendered as "raccoon" here is called "tanuki" in Japanese. To be precise, a tanuki is what some people call "raccoon dog," a different animal (no pun intended) altogether. It is found throughout Asia.

"S...Suicide?!" - Kyosuke
"I saw them, with their bags... get on the train that goes to Nunokawa Falls! The Nunokawa Falls are a popular spot for suicide, y'know!" - Komatsu

In this episode, the falls are named in honor of Mr. Nunokawa, president of Studio Pierrot!

"It's November the 15th! You know!" - Kyosuke
"Oh! It's 'National Gymnastics Day!'" - Kurumi

"Taiiku no Hi" (National Gymnastics Day, October 10th) commemorates the Tokyo Olympics that opened October 10th, 1964, and has been celebrated every year since 1966. Laws covering national holidays were amended in 1998, and effective 2000, the Taiiku no Hi will be the second Monday in October. As bizarre as it sounds, the change was made so that people who have Saturdays off will have a three-day weekend!

"It's the birthday of that baby panda!" - Manami

Pandas enjoy celebrity status in Japan. The birth of a baby panda is virtually guaranteed to become headline news.

"Hello, I'm your Bijo-Bijo Cosmetics sales consultant..." - saleswoman
"Not interested." - Kyosuke

Cosmetics saleswomen (ala Avon Ladies) are abundant in Japan as well. Here, the phrase "Bijo-Bijo" is a pun based on "Bijo" (beautiful women) and "Bisho-Bisho" (soaking wet).

"Maniattemasu" is a standard, formal way of saying that one is not interested in an unsolicited offer. Literally, it can mean "I/We have enough/plenty of it."

"...the 'Asaohyou Hyou' Mushroom, a.k.a. the 'Mushroom of Truth!'"

In the script, the writer felt it necessary to warn the cast that this mushroom doesn't exist!

"Who could've guessed that we were bound together by a yellow thread?!" - Komatsu

This is another reference to the infamous red thread.

"Er... "Because this is the way you really feel, you say... 'We celebrate the Mushroom on this late Autumn day.' '--- by Seiji.'" - Komatsu

Komatsu's attempt at poetry is no prize-winner. Our translation takes this into consideration!

"S...So that poor powerless Hatta can live for another day, gimme a hand, show your love, please!" - Hatta

"Ai no te" (literally "Hands of Love") is a standard phrase that's always used during charity campaigns to request donations.

"'Far into Autumn... Is the mountain changing its... attire?' --- by Kyosuke."

Here, Kyosuke tries a little haiku.

"Oh, Baasan, he's such a pain!" - Grandpa

Here, Grandpa is addressing his wife as "Baasan" or "Grandma." "Baasan" is a less formal way of saying "Obaasan," "Obaachan" (which is used by Kyosuke and the gang) or "Obaasama" (used by unrelated acquaintances, e.g. Hikaru).

""Tsubasa! Where have you been?" "Tsubasa! What happened to your leg!"" - Akemi

"Tsubasa" literally means "wings."

"And... on the night of the festival... That young man... that fool... returned." - Grandpa
"Oh! A Happy Ending! A Happy Ending!" - Hikaru

Such portrayals of fathers giving away their daughters are very common in Japanese dramas - hence Hikaru's comment.

"Oh! That kappa doll is so cute!" - Madoka

A Kappa is an amphibious creature that often shows up in Japanese tales. It is generally portrayed as a frog-like humanoid with a bird-like beak.

"'Companions.' The professional ladies who define beauty! And, supporting and cradling their charms are their professional undies! Yeah!" - Komatsu

A "Companion" (or more formally "Event Companion") refers to a model that demonstrates or simply poses with a product at a trade exhibit (e.g. auto, consumer electronics show, etc.)

Before the script was finalized, the following line was originally proposed:

Komatsu: "So innocently they do their thing, when everybody's watching, and all the cameras are pointing at them. Oh, the Companions, always smiling... And, how I desire to... er... underneath those veils of mystery... I... I..."

"Ain't it grand?! Ain't it grand?! Oh, it's too much for me to take!" - Komatsu

The phrase "Eejanaika! Eejanaika!" (Ain't it grand?!) is not only a humorous phrase - based on the fact that it's partly a Kansai-ben (southwestern) dialect which sounds inherently funny to those living in Kantoo (northeastern Japan), e.g. Tokyo - it's also a reference to the actual, important moment in Japanese history.

In the late 1860's, peasants staged the so-called "Yonaoshi Ikki" uprisings to reform society, calling for "world renewal," criticizing the Shogunate government and, in many areas, the rich as well. The "Eejanaika" Movement of 1867 persisted in many parts of the nation for over a year. Excited townspeople would be seen dancing in the streets en masse, shouting "Eejanaika!" Exactly how it began is the subject of many tales.

Interested readers may wish to consult the liner notes for "Red Lion" for more information.

"Stew and Pickles!" - Komatsu

The phrase "Konnyaku rakkyou" is used as a simple comic relief, and means absolutely nothing here.

To get really technical, "konnayaku" is a jello-like food made of a special kind of a potato grown in Japan, and "rakkyou" refers to a kind of pickled shallots or small onions.

"Don't you get it?! What if some weirdoes take advantage of him?!" - Manami "Y'know... It feels as if it was my conscience that just sneezed." - Komatsu

Many times in anime, a character is seen sneezing just as another character is talking behind his/her back. This comes from a common belief, which is actually based on a bizarre bit of history - Archaic literary works sometimes described just what kind of things were rumored, or talked about, through the number of times a particular character had sneezed!

"What part of Japan are you from, if I may so ask?" - Hatta
"Fukushima. Oh! Whaz'dat ya got dere?!" - Policeman

The script describes this character as "a policeman with a bit of country accent."

Part of the humor in this scene is the policeman's accent, which is very rare and noticeable in Tokyo - needless to say, it is made fun of quite often. Fukushima is out in the countryside, and so we've tried to give you that impression by spellin' thangz a l'il bit differently than we're usedta doin'!

"Hiding somethin', aren't ya?" - Policeman "Busted!" - Komatsu

Colloquially, "Shitakiri-suzume" refers to someone who can't say what's on his/her mind, whether hiding things or not.

For those interested, this is also a fable reference. "Shitakiri-suzume" (Tongue-less Sparrow) is a story about a sparrow that makes an uninvited visit to an old couple's house one day, licking a plateful of laundry starch. The mean-spirited wife captures the sparrow, and as a punishment, snips its tongue. The kind-hearted husband go finds the sparrow, to make sure that it is all right. The sparrow thanks him by letting him take home one of the trunks it kept. The man chooses the smallest one - which happened to contain gold. Seeing this, the wife then visits the sparrow, takes home the biggest trunk - only to be greeted by snakes and centipedes trapped inside.

"It...It'd be a nightmare if something like that happened! Hikaru's gonna lose it before I do!" - Kurumi

What's implied here is that Kurumi thinks she's in a lose-your-virginity race with Hikaru. This theme often shows up in many teenage dramas.

"You're right! I won't let her! 'Schwattch!'" - Kurumi

"Schwattch!" comes from "Ultraman," one of the most famous Japanese SF live-action classics. The phrase is what Ultraman "voiced" (technically, his mouth does not move) as he transformed from the human form that it assumed into a 200+ ft tall giant to fight alien monsters.

The series was first created in the 60's by Tsuburaya Eiji, who was responsible for the special effects for early Toho monster films such as "Godzilla." Mr. Tsuburaya went on to form his own company, Tsuburaya Productions, which produced countless Ultraman and monster features.

""Fuzzzz..." Can you hear that? That's the warm fuzziness I can hear in my heart." - Hikaru

In Japanese, there's an onomatopeia for just about everything, and the one used here in this scene is no exception.

"Do you understand what you're saying?! This is essentially an inevitably important situation in film-making basically a performance that symmetrically portrays the identity of one sukeban, to put it one way or another! To create agitation is the true meaning of being an independent film-maker! In other words, a form of trade-conflict is what's on the table..." - Komatsu

What Komatsu is saying here is mostly nonsense, relying on "big words" that he doesn't understand completely!

"I wonder if this means..." - Komatsu "...he's a Pod Person?!" - Hatta
"Oh, no? Then... it's Super Magic!" - Hatta

The Japanese phrase used here is "kamigakushi" (from "kami" - god and "kakusu" - to conceal), which refers to spontaneous disappearance that's believed to be caused by divine powers. Most people read about kamigakushi in fairy tales - as in bodysnatching tengu (the winged, long-nosed creature).

"I was talking about "My Place Is Whimsical Road!"" - Komatsu
"No... I'm not at all what you think I am..." - Kyosuke

The joke here is that the guys are referring to a fictitious TV series, "Orenchi Kimagure Dooro" (My Place is Whimsical Road), whose title is a compound pun: "Orenji Roodo" (the romanization of "Orange Road"). "Dooro" is Japanese for "road" (the "roodo" in the above) and "orenchi" is an informal, masculine form of saying "My place."

"The vanishing act you just did... It's called 'teleportation,' right? I saw it on TV last night." - Komatsu "Me too! The 'ESPer Mimi' show, right?" - Hatta

"Esper Mimi" is a reference to a popular manga series called "Esper Mami," which had its beginnings in the mid 70's. The Anime (TV) version aired about the same time as KOR, and the movie was released in the spring of '88. Not surprisingly, the latter was distributed by Toho. "Teleportation" was also the title of the opening song for the series!

"Th...That's right, you know, Oniichan can be like a kite with a broken string sometimes, y'know so, he vanishes suddenly, like all the time!" - Manami "Manami, you look like an octopus!" - Komatsu "I've had... this condition lately, facial ticks..." - Manami

Here, the joke is partly in the usage of homonyms - "tako" can mean "a kite" on one hand, while its homonym can mean "an octopus."

Additionally, in Japanese comics, an octopus is always depicted to be pouting - this is because its siphon does look like a pouted lips, hence Komatsu's remark.

"N...NO!" - Yuusaku (as the electric cable he's holding breaks)

At the very end of 1st part of Episode 36, the following dialogue was edited from the final version.

(The scene: all the lights have gone out. everyone is panicking.)

Komatsu: "Wh...What the?!"

Hatta: "Get the emergency lights! The lights!"

Kurumi & Manami: "(Screams) Perverts!"

Hatta: "Hey, Komatsu! That's my butt!"

"I'm Asayami Sachi of Koryo Police School, 3-B! A.k.a... The Sukeban Officer! If you don't fear this police memo-pad of mine, come and challenge me!" - Hikaru

This is a parody of the live-action series called "Sukeban Officer," which was broadcast in the mid 80's. Due to its popularity, the series produced two sequels as well as a movie. "Asamiya Sachi" is a take on "Asamiya Saki," the main heroine of the first Sukeban series.

"That's a MATTRESS! I was talking about a MAT from the gym!" - Manami

Both a mattress ("mattoresu") and mat ("matto"), the kind used in gym, can be referred to as a "matto," hence the confusion.

"I'll be right there!" - Hatta

The exact Japanese phrase used here is "Chotto mattottene," which is a very informal way of saying "I'll be there in a sec." The phrase is deliberately written to work as a pun because of the word "matto" from above.

"Don't just say it's a sticky mess, Hatta!" - Komatsu
"But what can I do if it won't budge?" - Hatta

"Hatta" happens to be a homonym for "stuck" or "pasted."

"Heroic Orange Legend! Madoka's Duel in the Blizzard."

The Japanese phrase used in the title, "Ninkyooden," refers to those tales in which the hero saves the weak, helpless victims while bringing down the powerful aggressors - a common theme in samurai and yakuza flicks!

"A...Ayukawa! Let me go with you!" - Kyosuke
"No... Please don't accompany me. 'Tis a duel that must be woman to woman." - Madoka

The scene is a parody of mediocre samurai flicks (eg: the ones AnimEigo doesn't release) The speech manners, music and scenery are all too typical.

"What're you doing, loafing around?! Have you found Oryuu or what?!" - A-ko

"Oryuu" is a common ancient name for women that often turns up in samurai movies. In the script, "Oryuu" is written using the kanji for "dragon." "O-" is a typical, archaic prefix for female names.

"It's obvious you're trying to make Manami pity you!" - Hatta "What a pitiful punk you are!" - Hatta "You should talk! Go pet a loach or something!" - Komatsu

This sequence relies on a pun - "doojoo" means "sympathy," "pity," etc., while "dojoo" refers to a small eel-like fish (called a "loach" in English).

"We're twin bagworms." - Komatsu and Hatta

A bagworm ("minomushi") is the larva of Thyridopteryx Ephemeraeformis, a moth species that causes hefty damage to trees. During its larva stage, it forms its own 'sleeping bag' using plant materials and silk. The tubular bag grows as the larva grows.

"That Oryuu girl... I just heard she got snatched! Madoka! You're going to save her, aren't you?! Please take me with you!" - Yuusaku

Yuusaku's headband reads "Hisshou" or "Victory."

"To the construction site in Green-Ward! Floor it!" - Policeman
"Ushiko! Wherefore art thou, Ushiko?" - Umao
"Umao! And, wherefore art thou, Umao?" - Ushiko

Note here that Umao is playing a woman's role, while Ushiko's playing her male lover!

"Oryuu the 'Cup-n-Ball' Ace is a good-for-nothing now!" - A-ko

"Kendama" is the children's wooden toy seen here. It has a ball (with a hole in it) attached by a string to its wooden handle that has two 'cups' and a pointed tip at its end - the object is to place the ball on the cups or the tip. Seasoned players can do this very quickly, time after time.

It is a common motif that Sukeban girls all have their own special weapons. A-ko uses a skateboard, Madoka uses guitar picks, and in one episode, a chunky Sukeban uses bowling balls!

"Say, Kurumi... there'll be big fancy cakes with gadzillions of strawberries, canaps with ikura, roasted chicken legs... and it's all "All-U-Can-Eat!" - Komatsu

"Ikura" is salmon roe, somewhat like caviar.

"Yattana, Pureibooya!" ("Oh! You've done it, Playboy!") - Komatsu
"I had so many choices that I had a tough time choosin'!" - Kazuya

The romanization of "Playboy" is "Pureibooi," and Japanese word for "boy" is "booya," so "Pureibooya" works as a pun.

"I woke up to the sound of my stomach growling. The fact that I didn't have my First Dream of the New Year made me feel like I'd missed out on something big." - Kyosuke

Tradition has it that the content of the "hatsuyume," the dream one has before waking up on the New Year's Day, determines how the rest of the year will go.

"How about some Ozouni? Or some Otoso, perhaps? Please tell me how I may serve you, Master." - Madoka

"Ozouni" (a clear soup with mochi, or rice cake, inside) and "Otoso" (a drink consisting of Sake and Chinese herbal medicine, said to supposedly take care of illness for the rest of the year) are traditionally served during the New Year's week.

"Clearly, the Otoshidama is tempting but then, Ayukawa in a Bunny costume is not to be missed...!" - Kyosuke

On the New Year's Day, adults give Otoshidama to children - These are cash gifts sealed inside special envelopes.

"Oh, it looks so good! I'm such a sucker for Soba-noodles!" - Kyosuke

Soba-noodles are very thin buckwheat noodles which are almost always eaten by dipping them into a cup of sauce.

"This must be my first time... To be like this... To enjoy Toshikoshi Soba-noodles together with someone." - Madoka

Soba-noodles served on New Year's Eve are called "Toshikoshi" (literally "Crossing over the year"). Since soba are long, they symbolize longevity. Eating the toshikoshi soba is a traditional rite to wish longevity and good health.

"Say! Say, you, my New Year's Eve Girl! Wanna go do the Kanetsuki with me tonight?" - Komatsu
"And after the clang, let's cling!" - Hatta

"Kanetsuki" (literally "Ringing of bells") are just one of the New Year's Eve festivies that are celebrated at Buddhist shrines and temples.

The "tsuki" in "kanetsuki" comes from the verb "tsuku" which means "to hit," "to strike," etc., as in ringing the bell using a hammer. A homonym of "tsuku" means "to stick," "to unite," etc. - Hatta's implication here is that he wants to get intimate with the girl.

Hatta's line is a pun which relies on alliteration, which we tried to preserve in the process of translation!

"T.A.P. Gun! Witness a miracle, in the voices that sing!" - Narrator
"Finally Opens Today at Toho Theaters Nationwide! Toho Advance Tickets Selling Fast!"

This type of display is exactly what Toho uses in their theatrical trailers, and the narrator is Toho's regular trailer narrator!

"First Dream of the New Year! Jingoro the Giant Monster Strikes Back!"

The title is in reference to the second Godzilla movie (released 1955). Godzilla movies were among the earliest monster-genre films produced and distributed by Toho.

While Sagisu Shiroo, a popular composer/arranger who is credited with hundreds of hit records, supervised the music to KOR, this particular episode consists of music written by Ifukube Akira, a celebrated composer of soundtracks to many Toho monster films. Viewers may immediately recognize tunes from the first Godzilla movie.

Around the time the episode aired, an 8-volume CD set called "Ifukube Akira - Complete Collection - Toho Live Action" was being released by Toshiba EMI. Mr. Ifukube has been composing for films without interruption since the 1940's!

"In the days when creatures we now call "Monsters" were just beginning to surface..." - Caption

The Japanese caption is not the translated version of the English caption that is on-screen. Thus, our translation reads considerably different from it!

"If I could just get a snapshot of it and sell it to the tabloids... What a scoop it'll be! What a great deal!"- Hatta "You said it! You said it!" - Komatsu

The pun here is based on the two phrases: "toku-dane" = "special news item" "toku da ne" = "Isn't that a bargain/good deal, etc."

"All right, kids! You aren't supposed to fight! It's snack time now. Today, we're having powdered skim milk!" - Hikaru

General Macarthur visited Japan after the WWII and recommended that wheat flour and milk products be added to the diet of Japanese people (previously, their diet was limited mainly to seafood and vegetables). The US began donating flour and powdered skim milk in the late 40's, mainly to schools. UNICEF began similar efforts in the 50's, subsidizing lunch programs for millions of school children nationwide.

The downside to all these humanitarian efforts is that many schools could only offer essentially the same menu for students on everyday basis - Powdered skim milk, for instance. Hence the children's reaction in this scene!

"I'm sure that the Black Fighter will protect us all. Yes, Kyosuke... I know who you really are. The fact that you risk your life in your work, for our sakes... That must be your way of showing your love for us." - Hikaru

Aside from being a "Top Gun" parody, this episode also pays homage to "Tiger Mask," an anime show about a wrestler-in-disguise, which aired between 1969 and 1971. Kyosuke and Hikaru's roles, his car, the school - these are all references to this classic!

And believe it or not, Tiger Mask (the main character) was played by none other than Mr. Tomiyama, the voice of Mr. Kasuga!

"In preparation for the battle in our homeland, we at TAP HQ shall be calling the creature 'Monster G' from now on." - Takashi "Why not 'X,' 'Y' or 'Z?' Why 'G?'" - Kyosuke

"Monster G" is an obvious reference to Godzilla.

The White Hart Pub

This is a reference to Arthur C. Clarke's Tales from the White Hart stories.

"Dr. Yamane, a biologist, has made the following comments:"

Dr. Yamane was the biologist in the first Godzilla movie.

"How could a cat pop out of the sea?! A cat from the gulf? From the gulf comes a cat...? Oh! I get it! A SEAGULF!" - Takashi "Commander, we'll return to your tasteless jokes later..." - an officer

The original joke in Japanese is based on the words "umi" (sea, gulf, ocean, etc.) and "neko" (cat). "Umineko" refers to a seagull. We tried to render this dialogue in such a way to preserve Takashi's "tasteless" attempt at humor!

"Just sit, relax, and leave everything to me!" - Kyosuke "Dad! I'm gonna do it!" - Kyosuke "You weren't supposed to say that!" - Takashi

"Dad! I'm gonna do it!" is a classic line that comes from a 70's anime show - Kyojin no Hoshi. Most Japanese recognize the source, as the show (and its sequels and reruns) is immensely popular even to this day.

There is an added twist to this, since Mr. Furuya, the voice behind Kyosuke, was the voice actor who uttered this deathless line in the original series! For more about this show, refer to the Part 1 of our liner notes.

"Sure Death Technique: Super Dimensional Comet Pegasus Major League Attack #1!" - Kyosuke

The "technique" line refers to numerous anime shows, such as Kyojin no Hoshi and Gatchaman. Sometime during the early years of anime, it became a clich for the main characters to climatically exhibit (and explain!) his/her "hissatsu-waza" (sure-death technique) - and this is a dead-on parody of those lines.

"Oh! Shot down! A plane's been shot down! The leader of TAP GUN, the squad that creamed Yojira and Redon Captain Ayukawa Madoka has been shot down by Monster G!" - Announcer

"Yojira" and "Redon" are spoofs of "Gojira" (Godzilla) and "Radon" (for obvious reasons, it's spelled Rodan in the American release), respectively.

Trivia: "Radon" (or "Rodan the Flying Monster" as it's known in US), released on December 1956, was Toho's first monster movie shot in color.

"That's right! We terminate them. And you call us 'These kinda guys?!'" - Komatsu "So, okay, won't you, er, just a li'l..." - Hatta

The scene immediately following the above was cut from the final version.

Manami: Say, that man who's chatting with Master... Is it true that he's Captain Ayukawa's former lover?

Komatsu: Yup! Always count on me for such info! I'm not known as "Komatsu the Ear from Hell" for nothing! "The Black Fighter..." Nobody knows who he is exactly... All we know is that he's Japanese. He gets paid to fight the monsters... basically a professional monster-terminator... From what I hear, he's also popular with children. He was once a member of the American TAP Gun team too. Captain Ayukawa was also a member there, when she was in the States... so I'm sure that's where they met.

Kurumi & Manami (in unison): A-ha...

Kurumi: I wonder, how far did they go?

All (unison): ...uh-huh... WHAT?!

"Jingoro... Jingoro..." - Kurumi and Manami

The song comes straight from the movie, "Mothra," and the words (it is NOT Japanese!) are exactly the same, except for "Jingoro" being used in place of "Mosura" (the Japanese romanization for "Mothra").

Here are the actual words to "Mothra's Song"

Lyrics: Yuki Koji
Music: Koseki Yuji
Performed by: The Peanuts (Ito Emi & Ito Yumi)

Mosura ya mosura
Doungan kasakuyan
Indoumu
Rusuto uiraadoa
Hanba hanbaamuyan
Randabanunradan
Tounjukanraa
Kasakuyaanmu

"I cannot believe that he is the last of the Jingoro... Ha! I've always wanted to say that line!" - Takashi

This line comes from the ending of the first Godzilla movie. Toho likes it so much that when they built their theater park, they inscribed the words on a plaque underneath the commemorative statue of Godzilla that stands at its entrance!

"I ejected, just before impact. I... consider myself quite lucky." - Madoka

Careful viewers will notice a super-deformed Madoka (among other goodies!) appears for one frame at the moment her plane explodes.

"My! Ojiisama, Obaasama, long time no see!" - Hikaru

"Ojiisama" and "Obaasama" are semi-formal ways of referring to grandfather and grandmother, respectively. Even though Hikaru is not related, the terms can be used to refer to unrelated elderly persons, as in this case.

"This time, for sure!" - Hatta

The inscriptions on the score boards read:

"Kyosuke" "Baaroo" ("Bozo!")
"Hikaru-chan" (+ heart mark)

and

"Hatta" "erai" ("He's the man!")
"Kurumi-chan" (+ heart mark)

"Thanks to the mysterious watch, so far, I've been able to keep on racking up points." - Kyosuke

The writing on the score board says "Kuyapii" (somewhat like "Ooo, that makes me mad!" in a Hikaru-speak!) written by Kurumi.

"Oh, stand still, Time! You are too beautiful!" - Hatta

This phrase is an obscure reference to the 1973 movie, "Visions of Eight," a documentary about athletes competing in Munich. Its Japanese title is "Toki yo tomare, Kimi wa utsukushii - Myunhen no 17 nichi" (Time, be still, You're beautiful - 17 Days in Munich)

"Ayukawa, those actors... They're both women, right?" - Kyosuke "That's right." - Madoka "I thought so... This is the first time I've seen something like this..." - Kyosuke

This episode starts out with a parody of the Takarazuka Revue Company, an all-women theater troop, performing their version (which is itself a parody) of "Gone With The Wind."

Takarazuka actresses (who play both male and female roles) are superstars in Japan and many parts of Asia. Understandably, a large number of thier fans are teenage girls.

"Call me 'Don Gabacho.'" - Rhett "You mean, 'Don Quixote.'" - Scarlett

President Don Gabacho is one of the main characters from a long-running children's puppet show on NHK (a government-subsidized TV network, somewhat akin to PBS in the US) called "Hyokkori Hyoutan-Jima" (loosely translatable as "A Gourd-Island Out of Nowhere").

"Tara! Home... I'll go home... To eat Tara-Chiri, I'll go home!" - Scarlett

In "Gone With The Wind," Tara is the name of plantation where Scarlett O'Hara lives.

"Tara" in Japanese happens to be the name of a fish (codfish), hence the pun! "Chiri" is a kind of stew or soup, usually containing tofu or rice in addition to fish meat. Tara-chiri (or, more commonly, Tara-chiri-nabe, "nabe" referring to a cooking pot or bowl) is just that - a codfish stew, a popular dish in the wintertime!

"Pervert! Pervert! Oops, that's not right! Terrible! Terrible!" - Hikaru

Hikaru wanted to say "taihen" (something awful, emergency, etc.) but starts out by saying the 'reversed' phrase "hentai," which means pervert, lewd person, maniac, etc.

"You know? Ever seen it? The lovers who were never accepted by adults... They rode the trolley on a journey into a world of their own." - Sumire

The dialogue here is in reference to the movie "Melody" (1971), starring Mark Lester, with music by the Bee Gees. This British film was a blockbuster smash in Japan, leading to the creation of many knockoffs and stories based on a similar theme.

"I believe that those two lovers, who rode the trolley are living happily, even to this day." - Sumire

A comment such as this one - referring to the two kids in "Melody" - regularly pops up in Japanese mass media.

"What?! Sumire is eloping with Ayukawa?!" - Hatta "That's right, hon! I heard that they looked really happy, and were headed to a factory site!" - Komatsu "Girl, I'll be damned!" - Hatta

Here, the guys' speech manner is feminine and colloquial, somewhat stereotypical of housewives or "girlfriends" talking to each other!

"A-ha... A Music Festival, eh? So... you applied for it?" - Madoka
"I put Darling down as our leader." - Hikaru

Music festivals and band contests are very common (and often taken very seriously!) in Japan, especially among high school students. The reason for this is that many record company execs scout new talent at such events.

In fact, during the 80's, some of the most popular TV shows were band contests (ala Star Search), from which many of the biggest music acts' careers were launched.

"Hee Hee! That Kasuga! What's he done this time?!" - Hatta
"You guys!" - Kyosuke
"Don't hold it against me, Kasuga. It's all your own fault anyway! How sad!" - Komatsu

"Sabishii!" ("How sad!"), works as a pun in Japanese. A homonym of "sabi" appears in the phrase Komatsu uses just before - "...mi kara deta sabi..." (your own fault).

"The Pikkaru's 'brightly shine,' you see... Right!" - Hikaru
"Gosh... Sounds like a little league team, huh?" - Yuusaku

The band's name ("Pikkaru's") comes from the phrase "pikkari hikaru," which means "to shine brightly/dazzlingly."

Yuusaku is thinking of the "Bikkii's," a little league team from a successful 70's TV series called "Ganbare Red Bikkii's!" (loosely translatable to "Break a Leg, Red Bikkii's!"), created by Ishimori Shoutarou ("Cyborg 009," "Kamen Raidaa (Masked Rider)," etc.) A sequel called "Soreyuke Red Bikkii's" (Go for it, Red Bikkii's!) was made in the early 80's.

"Gosh, you're being too soft-hearted, Manami! You've got to stop giving out 'obligation chocolates!'" - Kurumi "What's wrong with that?! As they say, 'show your love to boys who need it!'" - Manami

There is a traditional chocolate-giving custom in Japan on Valentine's Day. Girls generally present chocolates of high-quality to boys that they feel very close to or have feelings for. They may also give mediocre kinds to other male friends with whom they do not maintain close relationship (ex. a female office clerk and a male supervisor), perhaps out of obligation. The latter kind is called "Giri-Choko" or "obligation chocolate."

"Here you go. It's your turn today, Sempai!" - Hikaru

"Koukan Nikki" refers to diaries that friends exchange; they take turns writing it.

"I can't believe you, Bro! You're so conceited!" - Kurumi

This is a colloquial phrase using a figure from Japanese folklore. "Tengu" is a winged creature (see another section) that is said to have a long, tall nose. Figuratively, the phrase refers to how somone looks down on others, or is simply "stuck up."

"I'm not feeling good today..." - Kyosuke

Notice all the black crows. Crows generally symbolize bad luck, ill omens, etc.

"And now, representing the friends of the deceased let us welcome an exceptionally close friend of hers..." - Matsuoka

The funeral scene that we see in this sequence (including the procession) is typical of those held for someone of high importance (celebrities, corporate VIP's, etc.)

"If we don't at least do that much, she'll ridicule us from above, as a star up in the heavens!" - Komatsu

A common legend (often told in children's stories) holds that a deceased soul becomes a star in the sky.

"We've gotta go look for a juku!" - Hatta

Many students attend juku (supplementary school) on weekends and after regular school hours. This is where students are taught advanced lessons, mainly to prepare for college entrance exams - or, in this case, senior high school entrance exams, since Hatta and the gang are still in junior high. There are even juku for pre-school children as well!

"There's a bright future, that's like "Yippee," in store for all of you! Chin up! Chin up!" - Hikaru

The following line by Hikaru was edited out from this scene in the final version.

Hikaru: "Master! Make us lots of food!"

"Before the end of the Seventh Day after her death you must dig a tunnel through that mountain!" - Grandpa (in disguise)

In Buddhism, upon death, a soul is said to cross the Sanzu River in the netherworlds. "Shonanoka" refers to the seventh day after death, when the guardians of Sanzu decide upon the fate of each soul.

"Chug! Chug! Chug!" - Guys

In recent years, many phrases that we hear in older anime, as innocent sounding as they are, have been banned from most TV networks.

The phrase "ikki" ("chug") is one example. A certain network decided that the phrase might promote alcoholism. This is one reason KOR may not ever be seen again in its entirety on Japanese TV!

"A straight descent!" - Hikaru
"A diagonal descent!" - Madoka
"Ha! Talk about looking indecent!" - Yuusaku

Puns are a nightmare for translators, since there are no good solutions most of the time! Here is one example that works out.

The three words used in this pun are: "chokkakkou," "shakakkou" and "bukakkou."

While the "-kakkou" in the first two words relate to "descent" as in downhill skiing, the one used in "bukakkou" is a homonym that means "appearance" (or how presentable or sightly something is).

Thus, "Chokkakkou" and "Shakakkou" are "straight descent" and "diagnal descent," respectively. We've chosen to rely on the homonym, "decent," to make the pun work!

"You know, I... l..." - Yuusaku "'l...?'" - Hikaru "...love your skiing." - Yuusaku

This hilarious sequence relies on the fact that the words for "to like/love" and "ski" sound alike ("suki" and "sukii," respectively). Yuusaku wants to tell her that he loves her, but in the end he wimps out!

"You're napping away, and it's only noon!" - Madoka
"That's why it's called a noontime nap!" - Kyosuke

The Japanese word for "nap" is "hirune," which is written using two kanji characters - "hiru" (daylight/noon) and "ne" (sleep), so it can literally mean "to take a nap at noon," hence the pun!

"Oh! I know! Lemme guess... Your first love!" - Kyosuke
"Bingo!" - Madoka
"Yeah! Bingo...! What?!" - Kyosuke

The phrase "pinpon!" (which we rendered as "Bingo!") that is heard here is yet another Japanese onomatopeia for the ringing of a bell (as in a quiz show, indicating that the correct answer was given).

"Six years ago... Six years ago... Six years ago..." - Kyosuke

"Six years ago" in the KOR TV universe refers to 1982 - the year the "Macross" TV series appeared, Phoebe Cates became an overnight sensation... and Spinal Tap toured the US and Japan...

"Huh?! What's with this 100 coin?! Look! It says "500" here! What a neat toy!" - cashier

Kyosuke "time-slipped" to the spring of 1982. The first 500 Yen coin was not issued until later that year.

"I Found Love - And, Repeat From Beginning."

The title contains the phrase "Da Capo," which is a music term that means "to repeat (playing) from the start of a score." While the phrase itself is a vernacular in Japan (since knowing such terms is a part of compulsory education!), the situation is slightly different here in the US - hence, the rendering of the phrase we've chosen.

"K...Komatsu and Hatta..." - Kyosuke
"No 'Mr.' or anything? You don't know me!" - Komatsu

"Yobisute" is an act of calling someone by his/her name only, i.e. without using any honorifics. It is commonly done among close friends and colleagues. Kyosuke, for example, calls Ayukawa this way. Notice how Hatta, Komatsu and Kyosuke always refer to themselves without an honorific, except in rare occasions (when they want special attention, for instance!).

Also, school teachers usually yobisute their students, as do corporate higher-ups addressing their subordinates.

At times, yobisute can be rather insulting - it's never done among strangers or those who do not have close relationship. This scene illustrates that point.

Production Staff

Japanese Production Staff

Original Story: Matsumoto Izumi
Serialized in: Shonen Jump Weekly (Shueisha)

Planning: Nunokawa Yuuji & Fujiwara Masamichi
Producers: Horikoshi Tooru (TV Japan), Koono Hideo (Toho) & Fukakusa Reiko (Pierrot)

Series Producer: Terada Kenji
Chief Animation Director: Gotoo Masako
Character Design: Takada Akemi
Art Direction: Kobayashi Shichiroo, Nakamura Michitaka & Miura Satoshi
Director of Photography: Kaneko Jin
Music Director: Matsuura Noriyoshi
Music: Sagisu Shiroo

Screenplay: Ohashi Shikichi, Shizutani Isao, Terada Kenji & Tomita Yoshihiro

Storyboards: Anno Takashi, Goo Mitsuru, Hiba Takayuki, Ikegami Kazuhiko, Ishii Fumiko, Matsuzono Koo, Morikawa Shigeru, Nakamura Kooichiroo, Nibayashi Minoru, Suda Yumiko, Mochizuki Tomomitsu, Uemura Osamu, Uemura Shuu & Yokoyama Hiroyuki

Casting: Anno Takashi, Goo Mitsuru, Hiba Takayuki, Matsuzono Koo, Morikawa Shigeru, Nakamura Kooichiroo, Nibayashi Minoru, Sasaki Kazuhiro, Suda Yumiko, Tamano Akemi, Kobayashi Kazuhiko, Mochizuki Tomomitsu, Suzuki Yoshio & Yokoyama Hiroyuki

Animation Direction: Gotoo Takayuki, Hayashi Keiko, Hayashi Takafumi, Kishi Fumiko, Omokuni Yuuji, Shindaiji Sanjuroo, Sugiyama Toyami, Takakura Yoshihiko, Tsugiyama Toyami, Watanabe Mayumi, Yahata Tadashi, Yanagida Yoshiaki & Chiaki Kooichi

Lead Animators: Kaname Productions, NVC, Oosaka Anime-R, Studio Core, Studio Dub, Studio Jungle Gym, Aisaka Kooji, Aoshika Nobuo, Bessho Takehito, Chiaki Yuri, Emura Toyoaki, Fukushima Toyoaki, Funakoshi Hideyuki, Furuizumi Kooji, Hanabusa Taido, Hara Hiroshi, Hashimoto Keiji, Hashimoto Shinji, Hattori Ichiroo, Hayashi Keiko, Hayashi Shizuka, Hayashi Yoshiko, Ichikawa Osamu, Iida Hiroyoshi, Iiji Tsuyoshi, Ijiri Hiroyuki, Ikeno Yuuko, Ishida Atsuko, Itojima Masahiko, Itoo Kazuo, Itoo Shuuichi, Iwamura Sachiko, Kanaza Katsunori, Kinoshita Yutaka, Kishi Fumiko, Kitakubo Hiroyuki, Kobayashi Kazuzoo, Koizumi Takashi, Komurakata Hiroharu, Koomori Takahiro, Koyanagi Nobuyuki, Kume Issei, Kume Kazunari, Masayuki, Matsumoto Fumio, Minowa Satoru, Miyazaki Kenji, Mori Ken, Morikawa Sadami, Motani Hitoshi, Murata Shunji, Murata Toshiharu, Nakamura Jun, Nakamura Keiji, Nakano Misao, Nakayama Katsuichi, Nishimura Seiho, Nishizawa Shin, Ogata Yuuji, Ohara Yasushi, Oohashi Toshimitsu, Oonishi Masaya, Ozeki Kazuhiko, Ozeki Noriko, Saito Shuuichi, Saito Takuya, Saito Tetsuhito, Sakamoto Hideaki, Sakuma Shinji, Sarada Kenji, Sasaki Kazuhiro, Sendao Shuuichi, Shimoda Masami, Suzuki Junpachi, Suzuki Reiko, Tanaka Ayako, Tanizawa Yasushi, Toda Shin'ichi, Tokura Norimoto, Tsunoda Katsutoshi, Uchida Emiko, Uchida Keiko, Utsuki Isamu, Watanabe Yoshimi, Yamada Kaoru, Yamamoto Naoko, Yanagisawa Masahide & Yotsuya Mitsuhiro

Publicity: Iwagami Kishin (Nihon TV)
Assistant Producer: Fukuyoo Masako
Music Production: Toho Music Publishing (Ooba Tatsuo) & Nihon TV Music
Photography: Tokyo Animation Film, Uehara Ichiroo, Komatsu Yoshikazu, Ozaki Miki, Okayasu Yukiko & Fukunaga Kenji
Editing: Kakesu Editing Room - Kakesu Shuuichi & Ishida Satoru
Sound Effects: Itoo Katsumi - Suwara Productions
Sound Recording: Ootsuka Harutoshi
Recorded at: Seion Studios
Assistant Music Director: Watanabe Jun
Sound Production: Gen
Developed at: Tokyo Developing Labs
Production Desk: Homma Michiyuki
Production Consultant: Shizutani Isao
Production Supervisor: Suzuki Yoshio
Production Coordinators: Aoki Kuniyuki, Nishimura Yoshihiro, Hayakawa Masahiko & Okada Ki'ichi
Planning: Nihon TV
Produced by: Toho Co Ltd. & Studio Pierrot
US Production Staff
Executive Producer: Robert J Woodhead
Translator: Shin Kurokawa
Dialogue Checker: Ueki Natsumi
Subtitling Director: Robert J Woodhead

Voice Actors



The Cast of the Kimagure Orange Road TV Series

Furuya Tooru as Kasuga Kyosuke

An A-list voice talent since his early teens, Mr. Furuya, born 1953, has lent his voice to countless TV documentaries, commercials, anime and video games. His other anime credits include "Kyojin no Hoshi" from the 60's, "Maruko Pooro no Bouken" ("The Adventures of Marco Polo") in the 70's, as well as the recent batch of "Sailor Moon" series. This versatile actor had even replaced the voice of Hollywood actor Rob Lowe in a movie dubbed in Japanese.

Tsuru Hiromi as Ayukawa Madoka

Ms. Tsuru, a veteran actress/voice talent, has worked on innumerable TV, anime and video game productions since the 70's. Anime fans recognize her voice in "Arcadia of My Youth," "Shonan Bakusozoku," "Gall Force," "Macross," "Sailor Moon," "Dragonball," and many, many more. Needless to say, with this kind of a track record, most mortal industry pro-fessionals know not to mess with she who was "Madoka the Pick!"

Hara Eriko as Hiyama Hikaru

Although Robert, our CEO, had to be carried to a hospital for psychosurgery after being exposed to one too many 90-decibel "Kyappii!" during the production of this set, everyone else at AnimEigo has always loved Ms. Hara's performance in all the KOR titles. Her portrayal of Hikaru in the KOR Movie is among the best in anime. Her long anime credits include roles in such famous titles as "Gundam," "Gall Force" and "Anpan Man." She is also featured in the "Sailor Moon" series.

Tomizawa Michie as Kasuga Manami

As one of the highly sought-after voice actresses in the industry, she has had leading roles in major productions such as "Bubblegum Crisis," "Gall Force," "Sailor Moon" and "Crayon Shinchan." Just like Manami in Eps.14, Ms. Tomizawa says she is a big fan of professional wrestling!

Honda Chieko as Kasuga Kurumi

Ms. Honda began her professional work as a radio and TV voice talent in the early 80's. She became one of the top voice actresses, having appeared in numerous successful anime productions, such as "Riding Bean," "Minky Momo," "Gundam," and "Silent Moebius." We can't list her entire resume because it's too darn long, and just when you think she has enough work lined up, she's also keeping busy performing with a group called "The Ripple."

Ogata Ken'ichi as the adorable but much-abused Jingoro the Cat

Mr. Ogata, born 1942, is a veteran voice talent, whose resume must be as thick as a telephone book, having worked on countless TV documentaries, movies and commercials over the years. In the anime world, he worked in numerous successful titles since the mid 70's, such as "Majokko Megu-Chan" ("Li'l Witch Meg"), "Uchuu Senkan Yamato" (Space Cruiser Yamato, a.k.a. "Star Blazers") and "Captain Future." Mr. Ogata delivers all his lines in Cattish, which is alas impenetrable even to the crack AnimEigo translation team (our attempt to entice an actual cat to provide translations failed). His other works include roles in "Bubblegum Crisis," "Urusei Yatsura" and "Captain Harlock." Yes, he was Dr. Raven in BGC, and Mr. Moroboshi in UY!

Kikuchi Masami as Hino Yuusaku

Mr. Kikuchi's voice acting resume includes dozens of popular anime titles, including "Gundam," "Sailor Moon" and "Chibi Marukochan." Fans will recognize his voice in our Must-See-If-You-Are- Really-An-Anime-Fan release, "Otaku no Video." His most famous role is perhaps that of Morisato Keiichi in "Ah! Megamisama!" ("Oh! My Goddess!")

Namba Keiichi as Komatsu Seiji, Kyosuke's perverted friend

Mr. Namba is a very versatile voice talent who had worked on countless movie and TV productions. His anime credits include roles in "Transformers," "Gundam" and "Dragon Quest," just to name a few (out of gadzillions!).

Tatsuta Naoki as Hatta Kazuya, Kyosuke's other perverted buddy

Mr. Tatsuta is another voice-acting veteran. His voice is featured in popular anime titles such as "Dragonball," "Dragon Quest" and "Dirty Pair."

Yara Yuusaku as Master

A popular personality in the voice acting industry, Mr. Yara has worked on such titles as "Bubblegum Crisis," "Gall Force" and "Dominion."

Sakamoto Chika as Kyosuke's telepathic cousin, Kazuya

Ms. Sakamoto had lent her voice to Japanese-dubbed versions of American productions such as "Back to the Future" and "Family Ties." In the anime world, her voice was featured in such titles such as "Gundam" and "Sailor Moon," but she is perhaps most well-known as the voice behind Mei in "Tonari no Totoro" ("My Neighbor Totoro"). She also provides several incidental voices in KOR.

Tomiyama Kei as Kasuga Takashi

As one of the top-guns in the voice acting industry, Mr. Tomiyama was featured in tons of productions since the 70's (sorry, we're running out of ways to say "really a lot of"!), such as "Ginga Tetsudoo 999" ("Galaxy Express 999") and "Uchuu Senkan Yamato." Fans will recognize his voice in many, many anime titles. In "Riding Bean," for instance, he plays the hilarious Inspector Percy.

Suzuki Katsumi as Umao, and Nakajima Chisato as Ushiko

While his lines in KOR are very short, Mr. Suzuki has been in the voice acting profession for a very long time. He has had roles in other popular anime such as "Gall Force," "Bubblegum Crisis," "Macross" and "Kinnikuman" ("Muscleman"). Ms. Nakajima has had numerous small on-screen roles, in anime and video games. She has had roles in such titles as "Bubblegum Crisis" and "Kinnikuman" ("Muscle Man").

Shiozawa Kaneto as Matsuoka-sensei

Although he has a minor role in KOR, Mr. Shiozawa's resume reads like an encyclopedia. He had roles in "Bubblegum Crisis," "Vampire Princess Miyu," "Rupan III," "Shonan Bakusoozoku," "Transformers," "Crayon Shinchan," "Dragonball" and "Sailor Moon," just to name a few.

Shoo Mayumi: Aside from several incidentals, Ms. Shoo plays Oda Kumiko in Episode 21, "Kyosuke Thrown into a Pinch! Sweet Soft Nothings at the Wuthering Heights." Among others, she was featured in "Bubblegum Crisis," "Rupan III," "Vampire Princess Miyu" and "Gallforce."

Hayami Shoo: Mr. Hayami plays Kyosuke's "Beautiful" sempai, Kitakata, in Episode 20, "Hikaru Witnesses! Camp is Full of Dangers," and several incidentals. Not only a popular voice actor, he is one of the top anime singers in the business. He has had roles in "Dragonball," "Macross," "Orguss," "Transformers," and many, many others. In the KOR Movie, he makes a cameo appearance as the director of a musical troupe Hikaru tries out for.

Toda Keiko: This popular TV actress, who recently received the Japanese Academy Award's Best Supporting Actress Award, lent her voice to many Japanese-dubbed Hollywood movies as well as countless anime features since the early 80's. Some of the titles she worked in are "Anpan-Man" (in which she plays the main character of the same name), "Gundam," "Rupan III," "Hello Kitty" and "Majo no Takkyuubin" (affectionately known by anime fans as "Kiki's Delivery Service"). She even plays Sculley in the Japanese-dubbed version of the X-Files!

In KOR, she plays Yukari, the lead vocalist of the group, Swingtop, in Episode 22, "An Adult Relationship?! Madoka Secretly Returns Home in the Morning." Shin loves to boast the fact that he shares the same birthday. Robert likes to reply "Dream on, Shin-chan."

Ookura Masaaki: He plays Madoka's cousin, Shuuichi, in Episode 22, and has also appeared in "Bubblegum Crisis," "Perfect Blue," "Slayers," among others.

Kobayashi Michitaka: Several incidentals in KOR, such as the "surfer guy," and Komatsu's brother. Some of his other credits include "Riding Bean" and multiple roles in the "Bubblegum Crisis" series.

Yamada Eiko: Played the wrestling trainer in KOR. Her anime credits include "Akage no An" ("Anne of Green Gables") and "Sailor Moon."

Takamori Yoshino: Plays several "high school girls" in KOR. She has appeared in popular titles as "Crayon Shinchan," and in "Bubblegum Crisis," she played Sylvie. She is perhaps best known as the voice of Nadia in "Fushigi no Umi no Nadia" (commonly known as "Secret of the Blue Water").

Hamura Kyoko: Also plays several incidentals - including a "high school girl" and an "old woman." Her anime credits include "Bubblegum Crisis" and "Piitaa Pan no Bouken" ("The Adventures of Peter Pan").

Kitoo Satoko: She plays several "high school girls" throughout the KOR series. Her other anime roles include those in "Yamato Takeru" and "Maison Ikkoku."

Minaguchi Yuuko: Her most well-known characters are in "Dr. Slump," "Anpan-Man" and "Dragonball." She plays one of the high school students in KOR.

Yamaguchi Ken: Mr. Yamaguchi's credits include "Dragon Quest" and "Project A-Ko." He plays a small incidental role (a high school guy) in KOR.

Tanaka Kazumi: He also has a one-liner as one of the high school guys. Mr. Tanaka had roles in "Riding Bean," "Dagger of Kamui" and "Akira."

Ando Arisa: Her credits include "Iczer-1" and "Hokuto no Ken" ("Fist of the North Star"). She plays a mother in Episode 3.

Itoo Miki: She has played several roles in "Bubblegum Crisis," "Ah! Megami-sama," and "Gall Force." In Episode 3, she plays a burgershop clerk.

Sawaki Ikuya: The "old man" whose behind gets caned in episode 5 is played by Mr. Sawaki, whose anime credits include roles in "Spirit of Wonder," "Bubblegum Crisis" and "Dirty Pair."

Kawashima Chiyoko: Hikaru's mother is played by Ms. Kawashima, who had various roles in "Sailor Moon," "Captain Harlock" and "Gall Force."

Sasaki Nozomu: Mr. Sasaki plays one of the high school students, and perhaps other uncredited incidental roles. He is a popular voice actor and singer with a long list of credits, including Mackie Stingray in "Bubblegum Crisis."

Ootaki Shinya: Also from the BGC posse is Mr. Ootaki, who plays Sabu in Episode 9.

Sakakibara Yoshiko: Playing Madoka's mother is a veteran voice actress who can be heard on dozens of anime titles, including "Bubblegum Crisis," in which she plays Sylia Stingray.

Suzuki Reiko as Grandma, Ogata Ken'ichi as Grandpa

As a veteran voice actress, Ms. Suzuki's credits are incredibly long. Producers of "Ranma 1/2," "Totoro," "Fist of the North Star," "City Hunter" and "Minky Momo" have always depended on her gentle "grandma" voice.

Mr. Ogata, who plays Jingoro, also plays Kyosuke's grandfather (uncredited!). Careful listening reveals that he plays several incidental voices throughout KOR as well. See the Part 1 liner notes for more information.

Shioya Yoku as Young Takashi

Mr. Shioya's acting career began in the early 70's, and he lent his voice to many popular shows from that era, such as "Umi no Triton" (Triton of the Sea), "Gatchaman," "Mirai-Shoonen Conan" (Futureboy Conan). He is also featured in many popular titles as "Fire Tripper" (from Rumik World), "Green Legend Ran" and "Sailor Moon."

Kawashima Chiyoko as Hikaru's Mother

Although she had only few lines in KOR, Ms. Kawashima has had regular roles in a variety of anime series from the 70's on. Some of these titles include "Sailor Moon," "Please Save My Earth," "Captain Harlock" and "Saint Seiya."

Takada Yumi & Kawamura Maria - various roles

Some of the incidentals (high school students, sukeban girls, etc.) are done by Ms.Takada ("Crayon Shinchan," "Tenchi Muyu," "Orguss") and Ms. Kawamura ("Gallforce," "Megazone 23," "Yuuyuu Hakusho," "Compiler"), two of the most popular actresses in the industry.

Itoo Miki, Takano Urara - more sukeban roles

Ms. Itoo plays the sukeban gangleader "Yoko from Minato" in Episode 27. In addition to credits listed in Part 1, she has had roles in "Sailor Moon," "Rayearth" and "Project A-Ko."

Ms. Takano plays another sukeban in the same episode. Her voice is recognizable in such anime titles as "Bubblegum Crisis and "Saber Marionette," where she plays many supporting roles. Like many popular voice talents, she has recorded for countless video games and CD's.

Yamadera Kouichi as A Police Officer

Mr. Yamadera makes a cameo appearance in Episode 37 as one of the police officers who are after the furyoo girls. He has had countless roles in shows like "City Hunter," "Evangelion," "Ranma 1/2," "Pocket Monster" and "Compiler."

Yamamoto Yuriko as Hoshi Sumire

Making a guest appearance on KOR as Hoshi Sumire, a starry-eyed girl infatuated with Madoka, is this popular actress who has had regular leading roles in shows such as Iczer-1, Dancouger and Gallforce. Ms.Yamamoto was also featured in anime movies such as Dagger of Kamui and Arcadia of My Youth.

Tobita Norio as Hayami Jun

Mr.Tobita is a regular from numerous popular shows including , "Gundam," "Megazone 23," "Saber Marionette," "Otaku no Video" and "Chibi Maruko-Chan."

Yamada Eiko as Oryuu and Yukari

Ms. Yamada's credits include "Ranma 1/2," "Akage no An" (Anne of Green Gables), "Utsunomiko" and "Luna Varga." She plays Madoka's furyoo friend Oryuu, as well as Yukari in the part 2 of KOR TV Set.

Song Lyrics

Opening Theme: Night of Summerside
Lyrics: Urino Masao * Music: NOBODY * Arrangement: Shinkawa Hiroshi
Performed by Ikeda Masanori (Courtesy of Toshiba EMI)
Akuseru no himei sa, kishimu taia kara
Mishiranu kimi (onna) nose
tobidashita kuupe.
Oikakeru kage wo furikiri doa shimeta
Kimi wa "Dokodemo iikara hashitte!" to.

Deai wa haiuei jankushon.
Minato ga mieru koro
koi ni ochita to kizuita.
"Take me to Summer Side"
Kuchizuke yori
yasashisa ga hoshii to...
"Night of Summer Side"
...adokenasa de kaku(kyohi)shita
hitomi wa otona dattane.
"Take me to Summer Side"
Sabishisa yori
kuchizuke ga hoshii to...
"Night of Summer Side"
...furikaetta kimi no manazashi wa
otona dattane.
That's the accelerator screamin', as the tires
are squealin', takin' you along, a girl I hardly
knew, in my speedin' coupe.
You slammed the door, evadin' the shadows
that followed, sayin' "Take me anywhere,
Just go!"
An encounter is like a highway junction;
I've fallen in love with you - that I realized
by the time the seaport was in sight.
"Take me to Summer Side"
Sayin' that you desire tenderness
over a caress...
"Night of Summer Side"
...the way you avoided me, usin' that
nave look, wasn't so innocent.
"Take me to Summer Side"
Sayin' that you desire a caress
over loneliness...
"Night of Summer Side"
...the way you looked into my eyes as
you turned back wasn't so innocent.

Opening Theme: Orange Mystery
Lyrics: Urino Masao * Music: NOBODY * Arrangement: Sagisu Shiro
Performed by Nagashima Hideyuki (Courtesy of Toshiba EMI)
Kirameku umi e T-shatsu no mama
Kimi wa tondane kisu wo yokeru youni.

Nureta sukaato no shiroi hanabira
Aoi minomo ni hirogattekuyo.

Katame tojite boku no mono ni
Natteageru to ittanoni...
"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
Kimagure dane...
"Tell me you love me,
Tell me that you need me..."
"Tell Me, Tell Me" ...Natsu no tenshi.
"Tell me, lover, Tell me that you love me..."
"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
Koi wo shiteru
"Tell me you love me,
Tell me that you need me..."
"Tell Me, Tell Me" ...Kimi wa misuterii.

Natsu ga owareba sayonarayotte.

Itazurappoku boku wo mitsumeta ne.
Nagisa ni taoshita baiku ni utsuru
sora ni ochiteku kimi no namida.

Wakaranai ne kimitte ko wa.
Yasashisa dake ja shibarenai.

"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
Kimagure dane...
"Tell me, Lover, Tell me that you need me."
"Tell me, Tell me..." Kimi ga sukisa...
"Tell me, lover, Tell me that you love me..."
"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
Chikazuku hodo...
"Tell me, Lover, Tell me that you need me."
"Tell Me, Tell Me" ...Kimi wa misuterii.
"Tell me, lover, Tell me that you love me..."
As I tried to kiss you, as if to avoid me,
with your T-Shirt on, you dove
into the shining sea.
The white flower petals on your soaking skirt
spread open upon the surface
of the blue water.
Tell me why, when you winked,
to tell me that you'll be mine...
"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
You're unpredictable...
"Tell me you love me,
Tell me that you need me..."
"Tell Me, Tell Me" ...my Angel of the Summer.
"Tell me, lover, Tell me that you love me..."
"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
I know that you're in love...
"Tell me you love me,
Tell me that you need me..."
"Tell Me, Tell Me" ...but you're a mystery.

"When the summer ends,
it'll be over between us..."
You looked into my eyes as if to trick me.
The tears are falling on the reflected sky that
shines on the bike lying down by the beach.

I just can't seem to figure you out...
Why can't I hold you down with my tenderness alone?

"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
You're unpredictable...
"Tell me, Lover, Tell me that you need me."
"Tell me, Tell me..." I'm in love with you...
"Tell me, lover, Tell me that you love me..."
"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
...more and more, the closer I get to you...
"Tell me, Lover, Tell me that you need me."
"Tell Me, Tell Me" ...but you're a mystery.
"Tell me, lover, Tell me that you love me..."

Opening Theme: Kagami no Naka no Actress Actress in a Mirror
Lyrics & Music: Nakahara Meiko * Arrangement: Nishidaira Akira
Performed by Nakahara Meiko (Courtesy of Toshiba EMI)
Itsumo nara anata to sideseat de
kuruma o suberasu precious night.
Cancel no denwa ni uso no nioi.
Kizukanu furi de kitta wa.

Kawaita ato no manicure no iro.
Munashiku yoru o kazaru dake.

A-HA-HA...
Kagami no naka no actress.
Hakkiri ieba ii no ni
tamerai ga mimi moto de sasayaku.

"'Cause I love you..."
Kagami no naka no actress.
Enjiru tabi ni sugao ga
hanareteyuku.

"You've broken my heart."

A-HA-HA...
Kagami no naka no actress.
Isso naketara ii no ni
tsuyogari ga serifu o kaeteyuku.

"'Cause I love you..."
Kagami no naka no actress.
Tsumi no fukasa ni kizuite
modorenai wa.

"You've broken my heart."
Usually, I spend precious nights sitting
beside you as you drive along.
Your cancellation call smelled of a lie.
I hung up, pretending not to notice.

My manicure, now dried, is going to waste;
its color will just decorate the night.

A-HA-HA...
I'm the actress in the mirror.
Though I should say what I really feel,
hesitation whispers in my ear.

"'Cause I love you..."
I'm the actress in the mirror.
The more I put on an act, the
further away I get from my true self.

"You've broken my heart."

A-HA-HA...
I'm the actress in the mirror.
I wish I could bring myself to cry, but I
change what I say to fit my tough act.

"'Cause I love you..."
I'm the actress in the mirror.
I've realized my tragic mistake,
yet I cannot return.

"You've broken my heart."

Ending Theme: Natsu no Mirage (Summer Mirage)
Lyrics: Yukawa Reiko * Music: Tsukasa * Arrangement: Sagisu Shiroo
Performed by Wada Kanako (Courtesy of Toshiba EMI)
Asobigokoro ni jumon furikakete
Muchuu ni sasetai, anata no kokoro wo.
Koi wa de-javuu mishiranu omoide.
Kasanaru kuchibiru kanjiteruwa.
Love Me tendarii
Kin'iro no natsu no miraaju(shinkirou).
Some Day - Some Day
Suhada ni kuchizukete douzo
koibito to yobareru asa ni.
Some Day - Some Day
Itsumademo matteirunoyo.
I dream of casting a spell that captures your
heart and makes you crazy about me.
Love is dj vu; an unfamiliar memory.
I feel our lips pressing together.
Love me... tenderly...
Golden Summer Mirage...
Someday... Someday...
Please let my body feel your lips
on that morning I'll be called your lover.
Someday, someday...
I'll be waiting for that moment.

Ending Theme: Fire Love - Kanashii Heart wa Moeteiru (Fire Love - My Sad Heart is Burning)
Lyrics: Matsumoto Kazuki * Music: Inoue Daisuke
Arrangement: Shinkawa Hiroshi * Performed by Wada Kanako (Courtesy of Toshiba EMI)
Kanashii haato wa moeteiruwa.
"natsu ni hajimari"
Daite daite daite fire love.
"aki ni moetsuki"
Kanashii haato wa moeteiruwa.
"fuyu ni kareteku"
Yakete yakete yakete fire love.
Saigo no doraibu no yoru ni
yosoyuki no koewasure.
Sayonara o itta suiheisen mitsumete.
Kisetsu de kawaru hittokyoku
nareteyukutabi akiru.
Anata no yokogao sou itteru.
Honmei matteru anata no heya.
Kizukunoga ososugita anohi no telephone.

Kanashii haato wa moeteiruwa.
"natsu ni hajimari"
Daite daite daite fire love.
"aki ni moetsuki"
Kanashii haato wa moeteiruwa.
"fuyu ni kareteku"
Yakete yakete yakete fire love.
Omoide no anata keshite
"Stop, Stop, Stop."
Broken Heart is in Flames.
"It began in the summer..."
Hold me, Hold me, Hold me, Fire Love.
"It burnt up in the fall..."
Broken Heart is in Flames.
"It's withering in the winter..."
Flare, Flare, Flare like the Sun, Fire Love...
On that last night we went out for a drive,
I left my go-out voice behind.
As we watched the horizon, I said good-bye.
Like seasons, hit songs come and go. As
you get used to one, you're tired of it...
That's what's written on your profile.
You were waiting for the lucky star in
your room; I was too late to notice
it in that one phone call that day.
Broken Heart is in Flames.
"It began in the summer..."
Hold me, Hold me, Hold me, Fire Love.
"It burnt up in the fall..."
Broken Heart is in Flames.
"It's withering in the winter..."
Flare, Flare, Flare like the Sun, Fire Love...
Erase the memory of you from me...
"Stop, Stop, Stop."

Ending Theme: Dance in the Memories
Lyrics & Music: Nakahara Meiko * Arrangement: Nishihira Akira
Performed by Nakahara Meiko (Courtesy of Toshiba EMI)
I just dance in the sweet memories"
(Sweet memories)

Yuki ga odoru 'form e
iki o kirashite kaketekuru.
Tooi hi no station.

Aenai hibi ga shashin no yoo ni
anata o hohoemi ni kaeta no.


"I just dance in the sweet memories"
Kizutsuite aishikata o...
"I just dance in the sweet memories"
...oboeteyuku no ne.

"I just dance in the sweet memories"
(He's my one and only; you never can tell)
"I just dance in the sweet memories"
(Sweet memories)
"I just dance in the sweet memories"
"I just dance in the sweet memories"
(Sweet memories)

At a train station on a faraway day,
snowflakes dance on the platform, and
you came running, out of breath.

The days we've been apart changed
my memories of you to ones full of
smiles, like seeing pictures of you.

"I just dance in the sweet memories"
Each time we're hurt we learn...
"I just dance in the sweet memories"
...what it takes to love someone.

"I just dance in the sweet memories"
(He's my one and only; you never can tell)
"I just dance in the sweet memories"
(Sweet memories)
"I just dance in the sweet memories"

Furimuite My Darling (Turn Back My Darling)
Lyrics: Sawachi Takashi * Music and Arrangement: Sagisu Shirou
Performed by Fujishiro Minako
Turn Back, My Darling.
I love you so... love me too.
Akkerakanto anata
totte oki no shisen de
Hoka no ko homeru nante
chotto yurusenaiwa.
Sekkyokuteki ni watashi
toppyoushi mo nai hodo
oogesa na appiiru de shikkari aishichau.
Gaadoreiru wazato furatsuite.

Katate wo sashinobeta tsunawatari.

Darling I need you Darling I want you.
Love me and hold me tight.
Haru demo natsu demo
suki... Daisuki.
Aki demo fuyu demo
Itsumo
Tokubetsu na ai wo ageru.
Asa demo yoru demo suki
Daisuki.
Itsudemo dokodemo... nee
Furimuite My Darling.
Turn Back, My Darling.
I love you so... Love me too.
There you are with that look of yours,
looking dumbfounded...
How dare you compliment other
girls, I can't forgive you.
I'm gonna seduce you aggressively
like there's no tomorrow
to love you without any doubts.
You staggered along by the
guardrail on purpose...
You're walking on a tightrope
with one arm stretched out...
Darling, I need you. Darling, I want you.
Love me and hold me tight.
In the Spring or the Summer,
I will love you. "I love you."
In Autumn or Winter...
Anytime...
I'll give you my special love, just for you.
In the morning or at night,
I will love you.
I love you. Anytime, anywhere... OK?
Turn Back, My Darling.

Salvia no hana no you ni (Like A Sage Flower)
Lyrics: Yukawa Reiko * Music: Oda Yuuichirou * Arrangement: Irie Jun
Performed by Wada Kanako
Kuchibiru hitotsu ugokasudake de ai ga
furimuku nara, anata no kokoro ni
kotoba no tsubute nagete dakishimeruwa.
Tashikameruhodo setsunai mune no itami
wo; kakushite sotto hohoemu no negai
komete.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
Aisareru yori aishita hou ga
shinjitsu dakara.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
Atsui namida o anata ni ageru.
"You Are Everything To Me."
Anata no shisen tadotteyuku tabi soko ni
hoka no hito ga kokoro no mizuumi.
Kanashii kage utsushite namidatsukedo.
Toikakeru tabi kotaeru yasashii koe ga
kikoeru basho ni iraretara,
sore de ii no.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
Tsumetai kaze ni Salvia no hana
yureteru you ni...
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
...anata no soba de saiteitaino
"You Are Everything To Me."
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
Aisareru yori aishita hou ga shinjitsu dakara.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
Atsui namida o anata ni ageru.
"You Are Everything To Me."
If a mere whisper is all it takes to turn your
love around, I'd throw pebbles of words
into your heart to hold you tight.
My heart feels more pain the more I examine
it; I smile softly to hide it as I make a wish.

"Broken Heart to Dream..."
To love is more sincere
than to be loved.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
My tears of passion I dedicate to you...
"You Are Everything To Me."
Each time I follow your eyes I find there
awaits someone else. A sad shadow reflects
on the ripples of the lake inside your heart.
If I could be where a tender voice is always
there for me every time I seek it,
that's all I could wish for.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
Like the Salvia Flower that stands
against the cold breeze...
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
...I want to grow by your side.
"You Are Everything To Me..."
"Broken Heart To Dream..."
To love is more sincere than to be loved.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
My tears of passion I dedicate to you.
"You Are Everything To Me."
Introduction

"Kimagure Orange Road", an immensely successful manga comic feature created by Matsumoto Izumi, ran as a weekly series in the "Shuukan Shoonen Jampu" (Weekly Youth Jump) between 1984 and 1988. The story focuses on love and friendship, with lots of added silliness and slapstick comedy.

Fueled by its success as a published work, top industry professionals were recruited to adapt KOR to television, starting in 1987. All in all, 48 weekly TV episodes (plus a pilot) were produced.

While the stories were only loosely based on the comic version, the style that captured the hearts of millions of Jump readers remained the same. The KOR TV series became one of the most successful anime of the 80's, spawning several OVA's (all available from AnimEigo), CD's, novels and radio programs, as well as a theatrical release, "Ano Hi ni Kaeritai" (I Want To Return To That Day), also known as the "KOR Movie". It continues to attract millions of fans world-wide. Fan-fiction works based on KOR pop up on a regular basis. A sequel to the KOR movie was released in 1996.

AnimEigo is proud to be offering this classic on video and LD. However, without the support (and lots of begging!) of the KOR fan community, this project would never have happened. We would like to take this moment to thank every one of you who wrote to us asking us to release the KOR TV series, except for the 5 of you who threatened to have us all killed if we didn't do it.

About the Title

The word "kimagure" can be rendered several ways in English; it has a meaning similar to "capricious," "whimsical," "unpredictable," etc. In the context of the series, it relates to:

1) The main character's (Kasuga Kyosuke) personality, which is rather indecisive - he often has great trouble making up his mind as to what to do in a given situation. Most of all, he cannot decide who he likes better - Ayukawa Madoka or Hiyama Hikaru.

2) Madoka's mood swings.

"Orange Street" is the name of the street on which "ABCB", a coffee shop, is located. However, it is entirely unclear if this was Mr. Matsumoto's intention or just an after-the-fact addition. Most likely, he just likes the connotations of the word "Orange." Setting

KOR takes place in a fictitious town, somewhere in the Tokyo area.

Japanese Terms of Reference

Unlike English, Japanese employs a number of terms of reference and suffixes that describe the relationship between the speaker and the listener or subject. In our translation, we have left these terms of reference untranslated, or, in the case of suffixes, omitted them. Knowing what they mean, however, can enhance the experience of watching Kimagure Orange Road, so here is a short primer on their use.

Sempai literally means "Senior" and is used to respectfully refer to someone in the same social group as the speaker who is older or more experienced. Thus Hikaru often refers to Kyosuke as "Kasuga-sempai" or just "Sempai" when she is talking about him to other people. The inverse term is "Kohai," or "Junior." Occasionally we will render "XXX-Sempai" as "Sempai XXX" if the usage is particularly respectful as opposed to casual.

-chan is an affectionate suffix that is applied to the names of female acquaintances and also small children; when used between men, it implies a very close relationship. Similarly, -kun is often added to the names of boys. -san is the neutrally-polite suffix, the equivalent of "Mr.", "Mrs." or "Miss." -sama is a very respectful suffix, the equivalent of "Sir." Thus, we often see Hikaru referred to as "Hikaru-chan" by just about everyone, and Madoka usually calls Kyosuke "Kasuga-kun." Note however that because Madoka is using Kyosuke's last name, she's being a bit formal. Kyosuke, for his own part, hasn't had the guts to call Madoka anything other than Ayukawa, and rarely uses the suffixes (we think he's afraid that Madoka will beat him up if he "-chan's" her!). One of the more interesting usage's is that of Master, who often calls Madoka "Madoka-kun," which implies that they are very close, and that she's "one of the boys." Teachers will also often use -kun with everyone, regardless of gender.

When characters change the way they normally refer to someone else, you know some-thing's up. So listen for this.

Oniichan means "Big Brother," and is the common way for younger siblings to refer to their big brother. Oniisan would be a little more polite, of course. Oneechan means "Big Sister," and is also used by small children to refer to young women (who dread the day they stop being Oneechan's and become Obachan's [Aunties]). Imooto and Otooto mean "Little Sister" and "Little Brother." Other common terms include Otoosan (Father), Okaasan (Mother), Ojichan(Uncle), Obaachan (Grandmother) and Ojiichan (Grandfather). When Obaachan becomes Obaasan, you know the kid is wheedling for something!

Master is a common way to refer to the male proprietor of a coffee shop or bar. If he is a she, Mama is used.

Timeline

While the KOR universe in its manga version involved the actual years of 1984 to 1988, the time in which Kyosuke spent his 9th through 12th grade [in manga, as well as in the KOR Movie, Kyosuke was supposedly born on November 15, 1969], the TV version treats it slightly differently. It takes place during the years 1987 to 1988, the same years in which the episodes were actually broadcast. So, to confuse things, the TV Kyosuke was most likely born in 1972. To become more confused, see our Episode Airdates section.

The Birth of "Kimagure Orange Road"

Matsumoto Izumi wrote several short manga features before KOR came along, and they cast some light on how KOR came to be.

In "Live! Tottemo Rock'n'Roll" (Live! Very Rock'n'Roll), 1982, a slapstick comedy about a disorganized rock band, we are introduced to the band's lead vocalist, a fickle-minded girl named "Madoka."

In "Agechau My Heart" ("I'll Give You My Heart"), 1983, he begins to introduce "love comedy" features.

"Panic in Orange Avenue", 1983, became the next major precursor to KOR. In it, a band (named "Orange Avenue") led by one Otomo Hikaru, a girl vocalist with a unisex name, seeks a new guitarist. Hikaru makes a mistake of not saying that her band is an all-girls band. Yokota Yoshimi, a guy who also happens to have a unisex name, ends up joining the band because of a small miscommunication, i.e. Hikaru thought that Yoshimi was a girl, and Yoshimi thought that Hikaru was a guy! Matsumoto says that Orange Avenue's drummer also became the basis for Kurumi in KOR, and KOR's title and characters were much based on PiOA.

Also, in early '84, "Spring Wonder" was created (although it was never finished or published). In SW, a small girl named Hagino Mio is adopted by the Kasuga Family. The Kasuga's have a son named Fuuta, and the two quickly become very close. And when Fuuta and Mio hold hands together, they are able to use special paranormal powers. Matsumoto says that without SW, KOR wouldn't have been possible. The KOR comic series began soon afterwards, in the spring of '84.

The Name's the Thing

Manga creators are known to play around with their character's names. While most characters in KOR have more or less average-sounding Japanese names, there are subtle details which are worth pointing out. Here are just some for the kanji-impaired:

"Kasuga" = "Spring" + "day." "Spring" ("haru") is also poetically equivalent to "youth," and also synonymous to the word "seishun" (which is written using the kanji for "blue" and "spring." "Blue" too can mean "young," poetically in Japanese). "Seishun" can loosely be translated as "the most important time of youth." So a name like this is perfectly suited for someone who introduces himself to us with the phrase: "Kasuga Kyosuke - Seishun shitemasu!" (I, Kasuga Kyosuke, am living the best years of my life!). "Kasuga" also happens to be the name of a celebrated shrine in Nara, Japan.

"Kyosuke" is a common name.

"Ayukawa" = "AYU" + "River" "Ayu" is a species of fish (called 'sweetfish') similar to bass or trout, which makes a pilgrimage each spring, back to the river in which it came from. It is considered the king of freshwater fish.

"Madoka" is homonymous with the word that means 'tranquil.'

"Hiyama" = "HINOKI" + "Mountain" "Hinoki is a kind of cypress tree that is native to Japan. The name "Hinoki" comes from the fact that the tree was originally called "Hi-no-ki", or "Wood/Tree of Fire" because people from the ancient times used this tree to light fire.

"Hikaru" is homonymous with "to shine/light up."

"Hino" = "Fire" + "Field" Note how similar this is to "Hiyama" in many ways. This also emphasizes the closeness of Yuusaku and Hikaru.:

"Yuusaku" is also a common name. Since it uses a kanji character which means "heroic/brave," the name itself does convey a certain sense of strength.

"Umao" = "Horse" + a male name suffix, and "Ushiko" = "Cow" + a female name suffix. These are very uncommon names. Most parents aren't this cruel to their kids.

"Kurumi" is homonymous to "walnut."

More about the Characters

Kasuga Kyosuke

Except for having special "Powers," he is basically an average teenager. However, he is often characterized by his indecisive, somewhat 'wimpy' behavior. The narrative comments he makes are almost always stream-of-consciousness, full of incomplete thoughts and sentence fragments. In fact, certain lines are very ambiguous, sometimes not making any sense, even in the original Japanese.

Kyosuke is the oldest of the Kasuga children. He likes to make commentaries like "What if you become incapable of bearing children?!" There is a reason for this, which will become more clear in the second half of the box set.

Ayukawa Madoka

"Furyoo" refers to juvenile delinquents, the "bad boys and girls," and Madoka supposedly has a definite furyoo background. For more on that, you have to wait for our second set! Just about every school has its furyoo students, the kind seen smoking after school or even dressed like 50's American punks.

The viewers are rarely exposed to Madoka's parents, because they are apparently affiliated with the Chicago Philharmonic Orchestra, and thus spend a considerable amount of time abroad.

According to Mr. Matsumoto, Madoka's physique was inspired by the American actress Phoebe Cates. The anime Madoka was adapted by that illustrator and character designer extraordinaire, Ms. Takada Akemi (whose major anime credits include such classics as "Urusei Yatsura," "Creamy Mami," and "Patlabor.")

Kasuga Takashi

Mr. Kasuga does not have special Powers - they come from his late wife Akemi's side of the family. Akemi's family will appear in future episodes.

Also, Mr. Kasuga, like Mr. Moroboshi in Urusei Yatsura, is almost always seen reading newspapers when he is inside the house. This is actually a stereotype; the head of household being an avid newspaper reader!

Hiyama Hikaru

The name "Hikaru" (homonymous with "to shine/light up") clearly reflects her personality. Not only that, but since "Hikaru" is an unisex name (and this very fact having been exploited in one of Matsumoto's early works), the name cleverly works with her sometimes-tomboyish personality.

Hatta Kazuya & Komatsu Seiji

These are the "hentai," or perverted, friends of Kyosuke, and are actually based on Mr. Matsumoto's real-life associates. A Mr. Komatsu Seiji is a longtime friend, and a Mr. Hatta Kazuya was an assistant who had helped him on the first twelve volumes of the KOR manga series.

Kasuga Kurumi & Kasuga Manami

The twins are two years younger than Kyosuke. Manami is technically the older one, and she acts more "motherly" around the house.

Kurumi seems to be the baby of the family, and she does talk like a baby most of the time. Her famous line, "bun-bun," is a semi-nonsense babytalk. Kurumi was actually based on a character, named Koizumi Chiemi, that Matsumoto created in his early work, "Panic in Orange Avenue."

Master

Master's real name has never been disclosed. In Japan, it is common to refer to a male shopkeeper, especially in a coffee shop or a restaurant, as a "Masutaa" ("Master"), loosely based on a British custom. The female equivalent, by the way, is a "Mama."

Episode Notes

"We're supposed to be human beings, not motorcycles!"

Here Kyosuke actually uses a phrase "nanahan," a nickname for 750cc-class bikes.

"Wherefore art thou Ushiko..." "Wherefore art thou Umao..."

This dialogue, of course, comes from Romeo and Juliet. By the way, Ushiko and Umao's apartment number, "Apt. 102" can be read "ireini," which means "highly unusual."

"...and so, that building over there is the senior high school... ...and, beyond that is the college."

In the series, the junior high-school is a part of the Koryo School. At Koryo, it is said, a student does not have to take difficult entrance exams to advance from junior to senior high school, or from senior high to college. At most schools in Japan, very rigorous entrance exams are administered, so it seems that kids are taking it easy at Koryo. But the truth is that Koryo has much higher standards than most schools, as Madoka shows Kyosuke in a later episode! It should be noted that school systems like Koryo are rare in Japan.

"Interested? She's in Homeroom 'D...'"

Each homeroom has a number followed by a letter. Grade schools run from years 1 to 6, junior high runs from 1 to 3 (7th through 9th grades) and senior high from 1 to 3 (10th through 12th grades). The letters simply divide the grade up into arbitrary sections of roughly equivalent size.

Nosebleeds and Sneezes

A common myth holds that when a teenage boy is highly aroused, he gets a nosebleed. In fact, when a girl is said to be "good enough to make one's nose bleed," it means that she is a knock-out! Another common myth is that coming into contact with water can trigger a cold or the flu, hence Kyosuke starts sneezing just about every time he gets wet!

"A lot of the kids' families are well-to-do; the kids are 'raised in greenhouses.'"

This phrase refers to the fact that many rich families pamper and spoil their children like rare plants in a greenhouse. Koryo School is apparently a very selective establishment, catering to many rich families. Most Japanese magnet schools are like this.

"Bumble-bumble-bumble..."

"Bunbun" is a babytalk referring to the sound of bumblebees or the bees (sometimes beetles) themselves. Kurumi likes to use the phrase to mean "no, no!" but frankly, we liked this rendering (and "Bzzt! Bzzt!" on occasions).

"Well? How's the Tamago-yaki? Was it a bit too sweet?"

Tamago-yaki (or literally "baked egg") is the name given to solid chunks of prepared egg somewhat akin to an omelet. It usually includes sugar, hence the comment.

Bento

Most schools allow students to bring in lunchboxes ("bento") rather than making them eat school-prepared meals. Mothers often compete to produce artistic bento for their children; many books and TV shows are devoted to this ruthless sport.

The Legendary Cutlet Sandwich!

This sandwich is "an inexpensive, tasty, ultimate gourmet delight," and consists of fried pork, shredded lettuce, and various condiments. It should be noted that most schools do not have lunchtime pastry dealers such as the ones we see in KOR, however some magnet schools that became famous during the 80's publicized such luxury features as gourmet menu, designer uniforms, etc.

"All right, let's go for it! It's 'Cheek Time!'"

"Cheek Time" refers to "slow dancing," for obvious reasons. Trivia: In the script, the DJ is named "DJ Catman."

"Hikaru?! A Sensational C-Experience."

"C-Taiken," or "C" Experience, refers to "sex," based on 3 levels of "Taiken," originally published by a teenage magazine during the early 80's. They are: "A" = Kissing. "B" = Petting. "C" = Sex. Furthermore, sometimes "D" is added to mean "pregnancy." If you look at the shape of the letter, you'll understand why!

Egg-sake

Older generations often relied on this cold remedy made of egg yolk and sake. It is almost never administered among the young!

"It's true that she came over to my house but we were only chatting and drinking coffee!"

"Ocha wo nomu" is a phrase that literally means "to drink tea." It should be noted that the phrase in its most common usage does not refer specifically to tea-drinking; it could refer to anything from drinking any type of beverage (in this case, coffee) to just simply "chilling out."

"Oniichan, we got a souvenir for you! Look!"

This souvenir from Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan, is a wooden sculpture of a bear.

"...we'll only be tested on stuff up to Dazai Osamu's short story on pg. 28, right?"

"Dazai" refers to Dazai Osamu (1909-1948; real name "Tsushima Shuuji"), a novelist widely considered to be one of the most important post-WW2 writers, but since it sounds like "dasai," which is a colloquial phrase meaning "uncool" or "lame," it works as a pun.

"Actually, I was near the bottom of the top third at my previous school!"

It is common to refer to class rank in terms of "jou" (upper third), "chuu" (middle) and "ge" (lower third), rather than any specific number.

"The square root of 3 is 1.7320508..."

Japanese students often rely on mnemonics to memorize terms such as these, which they are expected to know.

1.7320508 = hi(1)-to(.)-na(7)-mi(3)-ni(2)-o(0)-go(5)-re(0)-ya(8)

It so happens that the phrase "hitonominiogoreya" sounds like a sentence: "go treat people..." (as in drinks etc.)

"Use an 'oar' to 'swiftly' cross the river" - Relative pronouns.

"oar" in Japanese ("ooru") and "all" are homonyms. Similarly "swiftly" ("zatto") and "that."

"The Lord of Soga Clan cries like a baby; 'tis 645 AD - The Taika Reforms."

645 AD was the year the Taika Reforms were introduced. Here the mnemonic is based on "(naki)mushi-gou(kyuu)," where: "mu" is another reading for "6," "shi" for "4," and "gou" for "5," hence "to cry loud, as in like a baby."

"Oh! Is that from Mr. Fried Chicken?"

A made-up fried-chicken joint, obviously based on Kentucky Fried Chicken. Japanese KFC joints actually do have statues of the Colonel at the entrance.

"Exams should be taken without using special powers. That's been the rule in the Kasuga Family for generations."

Actually, since Mr. Kasuga does not have any special Powers, he is actually referring to his wife's side of the family. It is not uncommon to refer to the wife's side as one's own, as he does here.

"Concentration..." and "concentric plug"

"Consento" is the Japanese word for a wall socket.

"ABCB"

This ordinary, very typical "kissaten," or a "coffee shop," is located on a street named "Orange Road." "ABCB" is pronounced "Abakabu" or "Abacab," based on title of the album "Abacab" by Genesis.

"All rise! Bow!"

Classes usually begin or end with this greeting. "Kiritsu" means "All rise," "Rei" means "Bow." They are followed by "Chakuseki," which means "to be seated," if the class is to begin, or "Kaisan" if the class is over.

"Drinking alcohol isn't that great of a thing, it seems."

The legal drinking age in Japan is 20.

"Yeah! 'Fickle-Minded Angel Humming Amidst the Flowers!'"

This is a reference to a girls' comic character who was always surrounded by flowers, singing and humming.

"'Sacrifice for what is important,' as the saying goes. "

The actual phrase is "Se ni hara wa kaerarenu," literally "the stomach can't replace the back." It is a saying that comes from a popular card game from the Edo period. Figuratively, the phrase means that sometimes one has to sacrifice something in order to deal with what is urgent.

"Her expressions. They change as fast as the eyes of a cat!"

"Neko no me no yoo" ("like the eyes of a cat") is a figurative phrase which means that something can change and adapt to any given situation. The saying comes from the fact that it is easy to see how a cat's eyes instantaneously react to the amount of light that is available.

"Young man! What's the meaning of this?! I don't want my merchandise played around with!"

Typical electric appliance stores in metropolitan areas have merchandise on display in front of the shop.

"Good afternoon." - Madoka

The fact that Madoka greets Master by saying "Ohayou," usually rendered as "Good morning," should not be considered exactly that. It is not uncommon to use "ohayou" even in the afternoon.

In fact, many anime professionals greet each other by saying "ohayou" any time of day. This is probably because they work such long and irregular hours that they never know what time of day it is.

"You can't stop me!" - Kyosuke "Don't kill yourself so soon!" - Hatta

In this scene, Hatta mistakenly assumes that Kyosuke is trying to jump out of the window to kill himself. In fact, there were many incidents in which students committed suicide this way.

"You scum should eat green-pea pastry!"

"Uguisu Pan" (or "Nightingale Bread") is the affectionate name given to a type of pastry which has anko (see below) made of green beans. One can get this basically anywhere.

"Here you go! Thank you very much. It'll be 1,250, sir." "Sheesh! Why should I have to pay for Yuusaku as well?!"

At the time of the broadcast, $1 was approximately 143 Yen (and at the rate things are going, it'll soon be at that rate again. Coincidence? We think not...) So a meal for three at that price was very reasonable.

Don't Ring the Wedding Bell!

We shall not mention the obvious and hilarious parody of "The Graduate." Ooops...

"...and so, you may find it hard to believe, but Japan and America were at war early in the Showa era."

The Showa ("Enlightened Peace") Era/Period refers to the years between 1926 and 1989.

"...th... the TILES?" - Kyosuke

The actual sentence that Kyosuke was supposed to read was written: "From the ancient times to the distant future Japan was and will be a marine nation..." One of the kanji characters (a verb) resembled that of "tile(s)," and Kyosuke misreads it.

"I wonder if the schools there have such a thing as 'Parents Visitation Day?'"

Japanese schools regularly host "Parents Visitation Days," allowing mom and dad to witness their children "at work." Children know it as the "day their teachers act nice."

"...that bitchy tease, loosens up a little in America!"

It is a common myth among the Japanese that they "loosen up" and lose some moral values upon spending considerable time abroad. This is based on stories that many "kikoku shijo," Japanese children who came back after spending some years in America, lacked the kind of rigorous moral standards and attitudes that the 'normal' Japanese children were taught.

"Er... Er... my mama was saying that you'll get tired of western food if that's all you're having, so she said she'd make some stewed daikon radishes for you." - Yuusaku

Daikon are a big long radish used in traditional Japanese dishes. Yuusaku and his mother are under the impression that Japanese won't make it on western foods alone.

"OK, then! 'For what we are about to receive!'"

"Itadakimasu" is a kind of prayer said before meals. It is meant to not only thank those who prepared the meals, but also everyone who was responsible (farmers, etc.) in making the ingredients and materials. The after-meal prayer is "Gochisoosama."

"Hikaru's made a debut, in Jr. High! Maybe I should try it too!"

This is in reference to the myriad of top idol-stars of the 80's who became overnight sensations. They were often labeled as "average junior/senior high school students" without much exceptional talents but were made celebrities because of their looks or personalities.

"Wanna drink?"

Viewers might note how most beverage cans in anime are so skinny. In Japan, this size (250 ml or approximately 8 oz) is a standard.

"Does she think it's OK to come to school wearing those clothes?!"

Most junior and senior high schools in Japan have strict dress codes. The uniforms such as those in KOR are the most traditional ones: boys are outfitted with fairly tight-fitting, dark (usually black, sometimes navy) suits, while girls wear the so-called "seiraa-fuku" ("sailor dress"). Some schools also require hats to be worn, others might require boys to shave their heads or girls to keep their hair within a certain length. Note that the "furyoo" ("delinquent") students are typically seen wearing oversized or unbuttoned uniforms --- e.g., guys with 50's greased hairdo wearing sunglasses and pants several sizes too big are most likely furyoo or a member of some gang!

To address dress code and other related issues that were frowned upon by most students, many magnet schools that popped up during the 80's offered such alternatives as uniforms designed by top fashion moguls. While grade schools and colleges generally have no dress code, it is very rare to find junior or senior high schools that do not employ them!

"Hatta's Melon-Bread... It's got an Oh-So-Cutesy texture... It's exceptional!"

"Melon Pan" is a typical snack food, a round piece of pastry with a somewhat moist outer coating. They retail for about 100 Yen each. While some actually incorporate cantaloupe extracts, most do not, because melon products (and melons themselves) are outrageously expensive in Japan.

"Pako" is a semi-nonsense 'word' which is sometimes used as a babytalk to mean "to munch," but in most cases it has not much meaning beyond its 'cute sounding' function.

"With contemporary trends in mind..." - Kurumi

Kurumi is talking like a typical fashion show MC. Also in this sequence, what Jingoro ends up looking like is a cross between some of the most famous pro-wrestlers and pet celebrities of the day.

"How dare you... when you're still in Jr. High! You'd better be accepting responsibility for this!" - Yuusaku

In this scene, Yuusaku thinks that Kyosuke had made Hikaru pregnant. In the 80's, there were many teenage TV dramas that dealt with this theme, and what Yuusaku says here are very stock lines from such shows.

"You're such a coward... you're the worst! We can't... We can't see each other anymore!"

The Tanabata festival is celebrated on July 7th. It is based on a Chinese legend of "Prince Hikoboshi" (also known as "Kengyuu" or a herdsman, represented by the constellation Altair) and "Princess Orihime" ("Weaving girl/princess," constellation Lyra) [note that there are many readings of these two figures]. The two constellations seem to come together on that night in the sky. The story goes that Orihime's father, the master of the heavens, allowed the two to see each other only once a year on the 7th day of the 7th lunar month.

On this day, people make wishes on pieces of paper that are hung on trees somewhat like Christmas decorations.

Visual Joke: When Madoka and Kyosuke are alone, you can see some wish-tags that contain messages such as "Kane ga hoshii" ("I want money"), "Hoshii Hoshii Hoshii" ("I want it! I want it! I want it!"), and "Onna hoshii" ("I want women"). They were added by some of the staff animators.

"Strong! The Era of Women Has Arrived New Female Pro Wrestlers."

Female professional wrestlers became instant celebrities in the late 70's. The "Beauty Pair" tag-team, for example, was an inspiration for "Dirty Pair," the anime characters who first made their debut in "Crusher Joe." The 80's saw many female wrestler celebrities, who were often seen more on TV variety shows (sitcoms, quiz shows, etc.) than in the ring.

"Right? "Rikidozan!" - Kasuga Takashi

Rikidozan was a celebrated sumo wrestler who traveled to United States to study professional wrestling. He became an wrestling superstar in the 50's.

"I promise I'll support you!" - Komatsu "I'll be your groupie!" - Hatta

Basically, another idol-star reference. Like every sport team, every idol star always had at least one "Ooendan" (Cheerleading Squad). Unlike American cheerleaders, ooendan usually consist of men.

"Allow me to be an idol star for a moment!"

"Oh, my love will ride the southern wind. Oh, the Blue Wind... come hither, then go run onto the island..." - Hikaru

An idol-star reference. The words actually come from a song by one of the biggest idol-stars of the 80's, Matsuda Seiko, who also released records in the US under the name of "Seiko." The song titled "Aoi Sangoshoo" (Blue Coral Reef) was her debut single in 1980, which made her an instant superstar, and is a standard karaoke classic. Hikaru's hairstyle is actually based on a famous one Seiko had during the early part of the 80's (and was imitated by girls all over Japan). During that period, which its survivors would love to forget, all the idol-stars had pretty much the same hairdo.

"I said, it's upside-down!" - Hikaru "Well, I was just thinking that it'd be more artistic upside-down!" - Kyosuke

Art aficionados will recognize this as a reference to Georg Baselitz, one of the fathers of the German Neo-Expressionists, who became an international sensation in the early 80's with his 'upside down' paintings. We told you these liner notes are educational.

"Will you swear it to 'Hell's Judge?'"

"Enma-Sama" refers to an entity in Buddhism. According to legend, Enma was once a divine figure in the heavens who judged souls upon their entering the realm of the afterlife, but eventually became the judge of hell.

"...the 'UFO' was flown by Kurumi."

In Japan, "UFO" is virtually synonymous with "spaceship", so UFO's are actually "identified flying objects!"

"Our agile camerawork! Our high-energy curiosity! And the shameless resolve to barge into other people's business! With these three talents in harmony, we make excellent reporters!" - Hatta and Komatsu

In presenting a material or product, the typical sales pitch harps on it's three most desirable features in order to convince the target audience. "Sanbyooshi sorotte!" or "three features in perfect harmony!," the pitch usually goes. In other words, Hatta and Komatsu are attempting to blatantly promote themselves in this scene.

"What?! Yuusaku, you don't believe in the existence of UFO's?! And, you claim to be a Newtype?!"

During the mid-80's, a political commentator came up with a term "shinjinrui," which could be rendered "New Generation/Type/Human Race/Species." Similar to the label "Generation X," it referred to young people who grew up during the Bubble Economy Era Japan, who were engrossed in lifestyles of overspending and extravagance that "their elders find so bizarre as to suggest another species." (Joseph J. Tobin, "Re-Made in Japan," Yale Univ. Press, 1992) Often, these young adults would be obsessed with expensive collecting (often of useless objects) and other hobbies which were looked down upon by their elders. Anime Otaku would, of course, be a particularly reprehensible subspecies of shinjinrui.

What Hikaru meant here, and how Yuusaku reacted, work as a pun. Yuusaku thinks that Hikaru actually meant that he was not a human being! And finally, to make the pun more bizarre, we couldn't resist turning it into a reference to a certain other anime series!

"Get lots of exercise, take care not to have any accidents and make your summer vacation a meaningful experience." - Principal

In just about every school that has an assembly ground, the principal speaks to the students on a regular basis, as in this scene. It is in fact a too-typical scene. This speech here also is a stock one.

"All right! Let's step on it! Okutama or bust!"

Okutama is a tourist resort in western Tokyo.

"The summer break that we've long waited for has finally arrived. Still... with all this homework that I have to do..."

It goes without saying that Japanese school systems are among the most rigorous in the world. Virtually all schools send their students off to their brief summer vacation loaded down with obscene amounts of homework to do. Many require diaries and daily problem sets to be completed.

"Hatta's oil is Super Ultra-Special Premium High-Grade Delicious stuff! Right?"

Hatta is using cooking oil here, the kind that's used to fry tempura.

"You idiot! You got almost half of them wrong!" - Madoka

Here, Madoka is imitating a mean, male teacher.

"Madoka's Challenge! The Haunted Beach's Big Wave Legend."

The original script called for "Big Wednesday" but it was changed to "Big Monday" sometime during the production! "Big Wednesday" was the name of a surfing movie by John Milius, produced in 1978. It is also known as "Summer of Innocence."

"Yeah, supposedly she's a stunning beauty... Her name is Koto, it's said."

While it was common for women to be named "Koto" in the past generations, it rarely occurs in the modern times. Hence the impact of the name it had on the characters. "Koto" is also the name of a stringed instrument, somewhat like a zither.

"If I eat any more, I'll turn into a mermaid!"

One mermaid legend says that if a person eats mermaid flesh, they can gain immortality. Another legend has it that if a person overeats fish, they will become a mermaid. There are countless such legends, and this scene is just based on one of them.

"I remember seeing a movie long ago... about a young couple, stranded on a deserted island just like we were."

This is either a reference to the famous Hollywood movie "The Blue Lagoon," the 1980 film with Brooke Shields, or its knockoff, "Paradise," from 1982, which featured Phoebe Cates (whose figure, as was mentioned previously, was the inspiration for Madoka's). Although the reference in the episode isn't clear, Kyosuke is thinking of the latter film.

"That was the so-called 'Contact Kiss.'"

A "Kansetsu Kisu" ("Contact Kiss") is said to occur when one shares the same bottle of drink, same utensils, etc. It is basically a term invented by teenagers who have yet to experience the real thing.

"Where two prefectures meet, a river runs through it."

The book Kyosuke reads on the train is titled "Ryoshu" (Loneliness While On A Journey).

"At our private school, you can slide like pasta from junior high to college..."

"Tokoroten-shiki" refers to a system in which something can progress without much effort, as in Kyosuke's school, where junior high students can continue on to senior high and college without taking rigorous entrance exams. The term comes from how "tokoroten," a gelatin, is served; you push a mold without much force, and it comes out easily like pasta.

"Looks like we'll be doing things in our assigned classes."

"Doing things in assigned classes" is a very typical way in which outdoor school events like the one in this story are done.

Kitakata is not a teacher, but most likely a college student at the Koryo School. His favorite word: "utsukushii" or "beautiful."

"Kyosuke in a Pinch. Sweet Nothings at the Wuthering Heights."

"Arashigaoka," which literally means "Stormy Hill," is actually the Japanese title of Bronte's classic work, "Wuthering Heights."

"Ooohhh! I can't hold back anymore! Here I go..." - Hatta
"D...Dumb-ass! If you can't hold it... then go to the bathroom NOW!" - Komatsu
"Ow! To the bathroom... Here I go!" - Hatta

This sequence revolves around a rather risqu (we're talking about Komatsu and Hatta, after all!) pun on the phrase "icchau." It is homonymous to various "icchau" as in:

1) "I'm gonna say it"

2) "I'm gonna go somewhere"

3) "I'm gonna achieve (something dirty)" (ex. "I'm gonna wet my pants")

The first time Hatta says the phrase, he meant "I'm gonna say it!" Komatsu quickly tries to persuade Hatta to do otherwise, and make it sound as if Hatta was actually saying "I'm gonna wet my pants!" On the last "icchau," Hatta changes the meaning to "I'm gonna go to the bathroom!" This is also a dirty pun because "icchau" is used by adults to mean "achieve an orgasm."

"After thinking about it I thought of having a 'summer experience' at that moment."

"Hitonatsu shichau," or "gonna have one experience of the summer," is basically a euphemism for losing one's virginity, with a slight poetic flavor to it.

"Thunder! I can't stand thunder!" - Komatsu
"Oh! I don't want my bellybutton to be taken away!" - Hatta

Japanese children are taught at a very young age that Oni are creatures that live on top of the clouds. When the Oni are upset, they create thunder and lightning, and go after children's bellybuttons. Obviously, Komatsu and Hatta still believe in this children's story. For more details on the Oni, see the Urusei Yatsura Liner notes.

"Damn! You know, he could be doing the old 'meow-meow' with her!" - Komatsu
"Here. 'Meow-meow.'" - Hatta
"Geez! What exactly is inside your head?!" - Komatsu

"Nyan nyan" is a babytalk for "a cat," and also onomatopoeic for meowing. Adults also use it to refer to "an intimate act." In this sequence, Komatsu meant just that, that he theorized that Kyosuke and Kumiko were "doing it," and assumed that Hatta knew what he meant. However, Hatta didn't recognize the meaning of the phrase.

"Let's pray for the spirits again next year." - Madoka "Go on... in my place..." - Oda Kumiko "As she set a lantern afloat I knew... I knew that the operation would be successful." - Kyosuke

Bon Ceremonies, which have Buddhist origins in China, are held in mid-August. It is believed that spirits of ancestors make a visit home during the beginning of the Bon Ceremonies. Prayers are offered, and by sending small 'boats' (basically small paper lanterns) down a river (this act is called "Shouryou Nagashi," or "Tourou Nagashi"), the spirits are honorably 'sent back.' For many people, these ceremonies do not necessarily have religious meaning per se, but are significant as a time of family gathering and well-wishing.

"Like the Salvia Flower that stands against the cold breeze, I want to grow by your side."

The red ribbon that Yukari wraps around Madoka and Kyosuke seems very trivial to westerners, but it actually represents a very important Japanese legend. It is said that two people tied by a red thread are destined to spend the rest of their lives together as lovers. This motif also appeared in one of the Urusei Yatsura Movies.

In real-life, the words to the song were written by Yukawa Reiko, who is one of the greatest songwriters in Japanese pop music history. It should be noted that, unlike most anime songs, virtually all the songs in KOR were written as normal pop tunes by hitmakers such as Ms. Yukawa and Urino Masao, whose songs dominated the charts throughout the 80's and 90's. "Night of Summer Side," for example, was a top-10 hit for Ikeda Masanori, then an idol-singer (currently one of the top daytime TV stars).

"Look where he's hiding!" - Yuusaku "You called?!" - a man

The man trying out a T-shirt (whose logo reads "Tonton the Panda") is drawn to look like a cross between a very generic yakuza gangster and a truck driver.

"We'd like to decide who will get to be our sacrificial lambs. Does anyone have a suggestion as to who to choose?"

Class polls like this are often conducted by a student 'leader.'

"Yes, the way he bites into a sandwich... it looks just like the Igangaa!" - Komatsu
"I believe that kind of thinking is... Ikangaa." - Hatta

"Igangaa" is based on "Gangaa" from "Astro Gangaa," a robot anime series from the 70's. The pun works like this: Igangaa -> Ikangaa, where "Ikan" means "not good" in Osaka dialect, which makes it sound like "It ain't good."

"Try running it by me again, I'm tellin' ya! Looks like I gotta beat the crap outta you to make you understand." - Kyosuke

In this sequence, Kyosuke is talking like a stereotypical gangster or even a samurai, in a very mean manner. (At the same time, Madoka answers like a stereotypical, submissive wife of a samurai!)

"Mountain." - Komatsu "River." - Hatta

This sequence in which the words "Mountain" and "River" are exchanged refers to the most basic greeting that was used among soldiers and spies throughout Japanese history.

"You'll be running 'fast,' without any hard training at all! I wish I could've told Seko or the Sou Brothers about it too, man!"

The Sou Brothers and Seko were three of the best marathon runners in the late 70's and early 80's. They became celebrities that today's marathon runners, amateurs and professionals alike, look up to.

"Free Anko... Psych! Just kidding."

"Anko" is a snack food made of red beans, sugar and some salt. It has a paste-like consistency of peanut-butter, and is usually very sweet. Often served on top of ice cream, or inside of a pastry as in "an-pan" (which is a nickname for "anko-pan" or "anko bread").

"Starting tomorrow, I'm gonna be making him special 'stamina lunches'..."

"Stamina Meals" refer to any foods which are known to boost energy, usually because of high carbohydrates, sugars and nutrition. Gatorade, for example, is considered a "stamina drink."

"By the time he learned to crawl, he was in intensive training..."

"Omoikondara shiren no michi wo..." These words are from the theme song to "Kyojin no Hoshi" (loosely translatable as "The Star of Giants"), an anime series from the 70's. The title (which in itself is a pun on many levels) refers to the 'star' of the Tokyo Giants (the famed baseball team), Hoshi (Star) Hyuuma, who was forced to become a baseball star by his father. Since his early childhood, Hyuuma was involved in intensive training on a daily basis.

"Kyojin no Hoshi" became such a successful show that it became a part of contemporary Japanese society, so much so that any father who forces his son to be in some kind of training could be (with a twist of humor) referred to as a "Mr. Hoshi." Ryuu-nosuke and her father in "Urusei Yatsura," for instance, are a classic example.

This sequence is particularly funny if you happen to know that the voice of Kasuga Kyosuke, Furuya Tooru, also provided the voice of Hoshi Hyuuma in "Star of the Giants," while still a teenager!

"That person's name is written with three characters... It begins with 'Hi-' and ends in '-ru.'"

Hikaru's name is not written with any kanji characters. It is written using three hiragana characters: "hi," "ka" and "ru."

"There's no way you can run fast with those bowlegs of yours!"

"Ganimata" (literally "Crab Thighs," sometimes called "'O'-Kyaku" or "'O'-Legged," Bowleg) occurs when legs grow slightly outward, causing a pronounced gap to develop between the knees. It is not considered aesthetically pleasing, and often made fun of. People with bowlegs are sometimes called "'O'-Legged" because the legs form an "O" like silhouette. The opposite of this is called "'X'-Kyaku."

Some male characters in anime are bowlegged if just for added sense of humor. They might be seen running with bowlegs, for instance.

On a personal note, Robert contends that this comment of Hikaru's is just another example of why she must die.

"It must mean that I've developed telepathic ability... Banzai!"

"Banzai" is a phrase that literally means "Prosper For Ever!", and most Americans know of it only as a war-cry used by Japanese troops in WW2 movies. However, these days it is used colloquially to express a feeling of great excitement. We felt it best to leave it untranslated.

Thus, upon receiving this KOR TV set, if you were a true Otaku, you would have shouted "Banzai!" too! You did, didn't you?

..."Oh, gosh! He makes me so mad!" - Kurumi
"Hello there. Thank you for waiting." - Kyosuke

After he hypnotizes himself, Kyosuke starts talking in a distinctly more formal and seemingly over-dramatic manner. The following examples go a few steps further.

"Days like this make me want to shout at the blue sky with all my might!" - Kyosuke
"Maybe the summer heat has finally penetrated and cooked his brain!" - Hatta

"If you're a man, then be straight-forward! Deal with it head on! Isn't that what it means to be young?! Isn't that what our youthful days are all about?!" - Kyosuke
"Talk about corny! His brain DID get cooked by the summer heat!" - Hatta

The phrases he uses come from teenage TV shows and movies from the decades past, when such themes were the raison d'etre for young adults throughout Japan. These days, however, most teenagers find such dialogues rather laughable.

"Got a minute?" - Madoka "What is it, Ayukawa-kun?" - Kyosuke
"'-kun?!'" - Madoka

Here, Kyosuke (still under hypnosis) is addressing Madoka by using "-kun," an honorific commonly used by fellow colleagues, or by teachers to address students. It's also generally used to address boys.

Among friends, for instance, "-kun" is only used to address males, as in "Kasuga-kun."

Using "-kun" to address women is generally left to male (and often much older) teachers and supervisors who would otherwise refer to them without using any honorific. There is a sense of distance when this form of addressing is used, hence Madoka's surprised reaction in this sequence.

"Breakin' Heart... Kiss me, 'til the morning comes..."

The song is performed by Tsubokura Yuiko, a top singer whose voice can be heard just about everywhere.

In the early 80's, Ms. Tsubokura was an A-list background singer who recorded with a veritable Who's Who of the Japanese pop music industry. Her solo projects from the mid 80's to early 90's included many anime songs (including an opening song for the KOR OAV's), and during the past several years, soundtracks for TV dramas. She was most recently featured in the Japanese production of the Broadway hit "Rent."

As a disguised member of the group "The B.B.Queens," she sang one of the most successful anime tunes of all time - "Odoru Ponpokorin" (from the show "Chibi Maruko-Chan") - for which the group picked up the prestigious Record Taishou (the Japanese equivalent of a Grammy).

"Hey, come on! What's the idea?"
"What do you mean?"
"You've wanted to see this movie, haven't you?"

This sequence is a parody of "American Graffiti" - Here, they call it "American Variety."

The poster says: Directed by Shooji Kiidesu -- Starring Ochaadoo Doreidesu

These names are plays on Jooji Ruukasu (George Lucas) and Richaado Doreifasu (Richard Dreyfus), respectively, and the phrase "Shooji Kiidesu" was made up to sound like "shoojikidesu," which means "I don't lie!"

Another movie poster showing a mother embracing her child is a play on the film, "Jiroo Monogatari" (Story of Jiroo), which was one of the box office hits of 1987. Here, it is spoofed as "Shiroo Monogatari."

"If ya ever see her... tell that bitch that Yoko from Minato-ku wants to pay her back." - Yoko

Furyoo, Sukeban and other bad Apples: "Furyoo" refers to high school delinquents and hoodlums who usually hang out in groups - not a very friendly bunch! Larger groups can become extremely territorial, often leading to deadly fights among neighboring groups.

Furyoo kids are often seen wearing oversized or unbuttoned school uniforms, with men sometimes sporting greased hairstyles reminiscent of the 60's USA! Others may look like anything from young yakuza members to punk rockers.

Furyoo girls are often referred to as "sukeban" or "suke" for short. At one time, Madoka apparently belonged to one such group.

"Yoko from Minato"

One of the classic Japanese pop tunes is "Minato no Yoko," a song about a furyoo girl named Yoko whose hangout was the Port ("Minato") of Yokosuka. (Ports such as Yokosuka were occupied by US officers after WWII, so a lot of Japanese living nearby had access to things American - rock&roll, jeans, bikes, leather jackets, etc. - In fact, that's how such goods were first imported!)

The song was performed by a "furyoo rock" group called "The Downtown Boogie-Woogie Band" in the 70's. Their leader, Uzaki Ryuudou, is a noted composer, having written hundreds of hit songs and scored such films as "Dagger of Kamui."

"Minato" is also the name of a district in Tokyo, thus "Yoko of Minato" not only works as a pun but pays tribute to the classic tune as well!

"S...Seems everybody's got it all wrong! Gosh, they sure put me in an awkward position!" - Kyosuke

The following scene was cut from the final version, just after this line:

Yuusaku (furious, and grabs Kyosuke by the chest): Yo! What's the idea, man! So this is why you wanted me to go to the hospital, eh?! How dare you use Madoka's injury as an excuse!

Kyosuke: N... Y... You've got it all wrong! I can explain!

Yuusaku: Excuse, eh?!

Komatsu (holding a camera): Hmmm! So energetic! Good! Good! And then, raise your fist a little further up... Then, knock him down, and then...

Yuusaku (seen through the viewfinder, close-up): Why, you... What do you think you're filming!!

Komatsu: Holy...!!

Hatta: Cut!! Not good!!

Komatsu (trying to calm everybody down): Don't you see, that enraged expression on your face... Now, there's the reason why Hikaru doesn't like you.

Yuusaku: Huh?!

Hatta: It's VERY obvious when seen through the lens...

Yuusaku: O...Oh!

Komatsu: Well, we'll teach you well! You know, what you've gotta do in order to be well-liked by girls... I mean, we wrote the book on its theory!

Hatta: ...though, as for the application...

Yuusaku: O...Oh!

"Here's your dinner: Udon-noodles! Enjoy them while they're hot, OK?" - Hikaru

Udon is the name given to thick buckwheat noodles, almost always served hot in a bowl containing soup-broth.

"I understand that you saved our Linda from being run over by a truck... Miss, it seems I've caused you trouble by leaving Linda with my kid brother." - Yoko

The body gesture seen here is a greeting of a very respectful kind - but one from samurai-era Japan!

"Lemmesee here... Huh?! What the heck is this?! Huh?! Oh?!" - Komatsu
"Permit me to contact her before you do!" - Hatta

Here, Hatta hands over a booklet showing what the script calls "Kaijin caado" or photo collection of "kaijin" (monsters/creatures). These monsters were made up for this scene (the names are actually puns):

Sameraa - (Same = shark)
Hanbaraa - (Hanba = from "Hanbaagaa" or Hamburger)
Nazoraa - (Nazo = mystery, hence the question mark)
Biidamaraa - (Biidama = glass marble)

"-raa" is a common suffix that's used for monster names. (Remember, Toho pioneered the monster-movie industry!)

"'3 frogs and 3 frogs' 'All together... 6 frogs'" "'The guest from next-door is a guest who likes to eat persimmons a lot!'" - Kyosuke

Here, Kyosuke tries out a couple of standard tongue-twisters.

The first one should be: "Kaeru pyokopyoko mi-pyokopyoko. Awasete pyokopyoko mu-pyokopyoko." ("Pyoko" can be thought as an onomatopia for a frog popping up.)

...but Kyosuke mangles it badly, and says: "Kaeru byogobyogo mi-byogobyogo. Awasete byogobyogo mu-byogobyogo"

Similarly, the second one should be: "Tonari no kyaku wa yoku kaki kuu kyaku da."

...but Kyosuke says: "Donari no gyagu wa yogu kaki kuu gyagu da."

All viewers of the KOR set may not watch any subsequent episodes until after they have mastered these tongue-twisters.

"You won't believe your eyes; Oniichan's got a real surprise for you!" - Kurumi

Here, Kurumi says the following phrase: "Odoroki momo no ki dokkidoki!"

This comes from an old saying, "Odoroki momo no ki sansho no ki," which is half-nonsense purely relying on a form of rhyming (using "ki") of the words "Odoroki"(Surprise), "Momo no ki"(Peach tree) and "Sansho no ki" (a kind of a pepper tree). The phrase is used to express a feeling of surprise or shock.

Kurumi's version is slightly different. "Dokkidoki" is a very colloquial term, based on onomatopia for heart pounding!

"Don't Cry Jingoro! The Heat of Young Love."
"Look, you, don't you know that puberty and the estrus cycle are when we've got to fight using reason!" - Komatsu

To be precise, the Japanese phrase used in the title ("Hatsujooki") is technically known as the estrus cycle. In its colloquial usage - it's used more often in everyday Japanese than in English - it can mean puberty (which actually refers to a slightly different thing) or anything similar.

For our translation of the title, we chose the colloquial approach. Komatsu's line is slightly more technical, so our rendering takes this into account.

"Anju! Zushio!" "Mother!" - Kyosuke

These names come from a play called "Sansho Dayu," or "Sansho the Bailiff." Anju and Zushio are two children who are sold into slavery to the bailiff after their mother had been sold into prostitution. The story is about the children's quest to find their mother.

"Still, tell me what happened? Your cutesy eyes are all red." - Hikaru
"Oh! Well... Nothing much, really." - Kyosuke

The phrase Hikaru uses to refer to Kyosuke's eyes is actually half babytalk!

"'When you meet someone for the first time sometimes love blooms, starting that very day! The stranger that you are and the stranger that you are...'" "We'll set you up on a date..." "Meow-Meow With A Punch!" - Komatsu and Hatta

There are a plentiful of matchmaking shows on Japanese TV, and here our favorite perferts parody them. The lines are pretty much stock.

"I'm your host, Komatsuya Iwashi!" "I'm the assistant host, Hattatei Buri!" - Komatsu and Hatta

The made-up names here are based on the fact that the given name of Akashiya Sanma, a famous comedian, is the name of a fish ("Sanma" = mackerel pike). A lot of comedians have "-ya" or "-tei" in their 'family' names, as they serve apprenticeships to a master, whose name they adopt.

"Iwashi" means sardine, and "Buri" means yellowtail. The latter is especially comedic, since it's also an onomatopeia for flatulence!

"A Tender Little Story! Kurumi's First Love - Chapter 'Hell'"

Colloquially, the Japanese title, "Konoha Monogatari," refers to short love stories but it can literally mean "a story of (fallen) leaves of a tree." Notice how and how much leaves appear symbolically in this episode.

"Hi, Kasuga! Got a moment?" - Komatsu
"What do you want?! You're grossing me out!" - Kyosuke

The phrase "Uffuuun!" that's heard here is not a real word. Komatsu is imitating a woman laughing in a sensual manner.

"'You shampooed your hair this morning! Sure smells nice!'" - Komatsu
"'Oh! Coach!'" - a girl

Sometimes little things, as bizarre as they are, become extremely trendy. "Asa-shan" (shampooing hair before going to school) or "Morning Shampoo" was a fad in the early 80's!

"Lady Hikaru! I, Yuusaku, have brought that which you sought!" - Yuusaku
"What's with this?! I asked you to bring me a coffee-milk!" - Hikaru
"B...But, it was sold out... Fruit juice is good too, I'm sure..." - Yuusaku

The two kinds of milk offered in schools are regular milk and coffee-milk. In Japan, coffee-milk is as common as chocolate-milk is in the US.

"D...D...Don't you... like s... s... s... Don't you like sukiyaki?!" - Manami

The pun here relies on "suki" (to like/love, etc.) and "sukiyaki" (cooked beef in broth). Manami wanted to ask if Hayami has someone special, or 'likes someone else' already.

"Good-bye, Kurumi! I'll write you, once I get settled!" - Hayami

Notice the red tape. Longtime readers of our liner notes will already know the symbolic meaning of a red thread.

"K...Kasuga! Have you heard?! Yuusaku confessed his love for Ayukawa!" - Komatsu

Often in anime, this topic may appear overly dramatic to westerners, but love confessions ("kokuhaku") are a big thing for Japanese teens, so much so that kids take them extremely seriously!

"Just because Yuusaku and I were childhood chums, he's been pestering and bugging me like some annoying housefly!" - Hikaru

The onomatopeia ("Buuun!") voiced by Yuusaku here is generally used to describe things that fly - airplanes, insects, etc. - Akin to how "Bzzz" is used in English.

"A dog?! A pig?! A raccoon?! Just what in the hell are you?!" - Kyosuke

What we rendered as "raccoon" here is called "tanuki" in Japanese. To be precise, a tanuki is what some people call "raccoon dog," a different animal (no pun intended) altogether. It is found throughout Asia.

"S...Suicide?!" - Kyosuke
"I saw them, with their bags... get on the train that goes to Nunokawa Falls! The Nunokawa Falls are a popular spot for suicide, y'know!" - Komatsu

In this episode, the falls are named in honor of Mr. Nunokawa, president of Studio Pierrot!

"It's November the 15th! You know!" - Kyosuke
"Oh! It's 'National Gymnastics Day!'" - Kurumi

"Taiiku no Hi" (National Gymnastics Day, October 10th) commemorates the Tokyo Olympics that opened October 10th, 1964, and has been celebrated every year since 1966. Laws covering national holidays were amended in 1998, and effective 2000, the Taiiku no Hi will be the second Monday in October. As bizarre as it sounds, the change was made so that people who have Saturdays off will have a three-day weekend!

"It's the birthday of that baby panda!" - Manami

Pandas enjoy celebrity status in Japan. The birth of a baby panda is virtually guaranteed to become headline news.

"Hello, I'm your Bijo-Bijo Cosmetics sales consultant..." - saleswoman
"Not interested." - Kyosuke

Cosmetics saleswomen (ala Avon Ladies) are abundant in Japan as well. Here, the phrase "Bijo-Bijo" is a pun based on "Bijo" (beautiful women) and "Bisho-Bisho" (soaking wet).

"Maniattemasu" is a standard, formal way of saying that one is not interested in an unsolicited offer. Literally, it can mean "I/We have enough/plenty of it."

"...the 'Asaohyou Hyou' Mushroom, a.k.a. the 'Mushroom of Truth!'"

In the script, the writer felt it necessary to warn the cast that this mushroom doesn't exist!

"Who could've guessed that we were bound together by a yellow thread?!" - Komatsu

This is another reference to the infamous red thread.

"Er... "Because this is the way you really feel, you say... 'We celebrate the Mushroom on this late Autumn day.' '--- by Seiji.'" - Komatsu

Komatsu's attempt at poetry is no prize-winner. Our translation takes this into consideration!

"S...So that poor powerless Hatta can live for another day, gimme a hand, show your love, please!" - Hatta

"Ai no te" (literally "Hands of Love") is a standard phrase that's always used during charity campaigns to request donations.

"'Far into Autumn... Is the mountain changing its... attire?' --- by Kyosuke."

Here, Kyosuke tries a little haiku.

"Oh, Baasan, he's such a pain!" - Grandpa

Here, Grandpa is addressing his wife as "Baasan" or "Grandma." "Baasan" is a less formal way of saying "Obaasan," "Obaachan" (which is used by Kyosuke and the gang) or "Obaasama" (used by unrelated acquaintances, e.g. Hikaru).

""Tsubasa! Where have you been?" "Tsubasa! What happened to your leg!"" - Akemi

"Tsubasa" literally means "wings."

"And... on the night of the festival... That young man... that fool... returned." - Grandpa
"Oh! A Happy Ending! A Happy Ending!" - Hikaru

Such portrayals of fathers giving away their daughters are very common in Japanese dramas - hence Hikaru's comment.

"Oh! That kappa doll is so cute!" - Madoka

A Kappa is an amphibious creature that often shows up in Japanese tales. It is generally portrayed as a frog-like humanoid with a bird-like beak.

"'Companions.' The professional ladies who define beauty! And, supporting and cradling their charms are their professional undies! Yeah!" - Komatsu

A "Companion" (or more formally "Event Companion") refers to a model that demonstrates or simply poses with a product at a trade exhibit (e.g. auto, consumer electronics show, etc.)

Before the script was finalized, the following line was originally proposed:

Komatsu: "So innocently they do their thing, when everybody's watching, and all the cameras are pointing at them. Oh, the Companions, always smiling... And, how I desire to... er... underneath those veils of mystery... I... I..."

"Ain't it grand?! Ain't it grand?! Oh, it's too much for me to take!" - Komatsu

The phrase "Eejanaika! Eejanaika!" (Ain't it grand?!) is not only a humorous phrase - based on the fact that it's partly a Kansai-ben (southwestern) dialect which sounds inherently funny to those living in Kantoo (northeastern Japan), e.g. Tokyo - it's also a reference to the actual, important moment in Japanese history.

In the late 1860's, peasants staged the so-called "Yonaoshi Ikki" uprisings to reform society, calling for "world renewal," criticizing the Shogunate government and, in many areas, the rich as well. The "Eejanaika" Movement of 1867 persisted in many parts of the nation for over a year. Excited townspeople would be seen dancing in the streets en masse, shouting "Eejanaika!" Exactly how it began is the subject of many tales.

Interested readers may wish to consult the liner notes for "Red Lion" for more information.

"Stew and Pickles!" - Komatsu

The phrase "Konnyaku rakkyou" is used as a simple comic relief, and means absolutely nothing here.

To get really technical, "konnayaku" is a jello-like food made of a special kind of a potato grown in Japan, and "rakkyou" refers to a kind of pickled shallots or small onions.

"Don't you get it?! What if some weirdoes take advantage of him?!" - Manami "Y'know... It feels as if it was my conscience that just sneezed." - Komatsu

Many times in anime, a character is seen sneezing just as another character is talking behind his/her back. This comes from a common belief, which is actually based on a bizarre bit of history - Archaic literary works sometimes described just what kind of things were rumored, or talked about, through the number of times a particular character had sneezed!

"What part of Japan are you from, if I may so ask?" - Hatta
"Fukushima. Oh! Whaz'dat ya got dere?!" - Policeman

The script describes this character as "a policeman with a bit of country accent."

Part of the humor in this scene is the policeman's accent, which is very rare and noticeable in Tokyo - needless to say, it is made fun of quite often. Fukushima is out in the countryside, and so we've tried to give you that impression by spellin' thangz a l'il bit differently than we're usedta doin'!

"Hiding somethin', aren't ya?" - Policeman "Busted!" - Komatsu

Colloquially, "Shitakiri-suzume" refers to someone who can't say what's on his/her mind, whether hiding things or not.

For those interested, this is also a fable reference. "Shitakiri-suzume" (Tongue-less Sparrow) is a story about a sparrow that makes an uninvited visit to an old couple's house one day, licking a plateful of laundry starch. The mean-spirited wife captures the sparrow, and as a punishment, snips its tongue. The kind-hearted husband go finds the sparrow, to make sure that it is all right. The sparrow thanks him by letting him take home one of the trunks it kept. The man chooses the smallest one - which happened to contain gold. Seeing this, the wife then visits the sparrow, takes home the biggest trunk - only to be greeted by snakes and centipedes trapped inside.

"It...It'd be a nightmare if something like that happened! Hikaru's gonna lose it before I do!" - Kurumi

What's implied here is that Kurumi thinks she's in a lose-your-virginity race with Hikaru. This theme often shows up in many teenage dramas.

"You're right! I won't let her! 'Schwattch!'" - Kurumi

"Schwattch!" comes from "Ultraman," one of the most famous Japanese SF live-action classics. The phrase is what Ultraman "voiced" (technically, his mouth does not move) as he transformed from the human form that it assumed into a 200+ ft tall giant to fight alien monsters.

The series was first created in the 60's by Tsuburaya Eiji, who was responsible for the special effects for early Toho monster films such as "Godzilla." Mr. Tsuburaya went on to form his own company, Tsuburaya Productions, which produced countless Ultraman and monster features.

""Fuzzzz..." Can you hear that? That's the warm fuzziness I can hear in my heart." - Hikaru

In Japanese, there's an onomatopeia for just about everything, and the one used here in this scene is no exception.

"Do you understand what you're saying?! This is essentially an inevitably important situation in film-making basically a performance that symmetrically portrays the identity of one sukeban, to put it one way or another! To create agitation is the true meaning of being an independent film-maker! In other words, a form of trade-conflict is what's on the table..." - Komatsu

What Komatsu is saying here is mostly nonsense, relying on "big words" that he doesn't understand completely!

"I wonder if this means..." - Komatsu "...he's a Pod Person?!" - Hatta
"Oh, no? Then... it's Super Magic!" - Hatta

The Japanese phrase used here is "kamigakushi" (from "kami" - god and "kakusu" - to conceal), which refers to spontaneous disappearance that's believed to be caused by divine powers. Most people read about kamigakushi in fairy tales - as in bodysnatching tengu (the winged, long-nosed creature).

"I was talking about "My Place Is Whimsical Road!"" - Komatsu
"No... I'm not at all what you think I am..." - Kyosuke

The joke here is that the guys are referring to a fictitious TV series, "Orenchi Kimagure Dooro" (My Place is Whimsical Road), whose title is a compound pun: "Orenji Roodo" (the romanization of "Orange Road"). "Dooro" is Japanese for "road" (the "roodo" in the above) and "orenchi" is an informal, masculine form of saying "My place."

"The vanishing act you just did... It's called 'teleportation,' right? I saw it on TV last night." - Komatsu "Me too! The 'ESPer Mimi' show, right?" - Hatta

"Esper Mimi" is a reference to a popular manga series called "Esper Mami," which had its beginnings in the mid 70's. The Anime (TV) version aired about the same time as KOR, and the movie was released in the spring of '88. Not surprisingly, the latter was distributed by Toho. "Teleportation" was also the title of the opening song for the series!

"Th...That's right, you know, Oniichan can be like a kite with a broken string sometimes, y'know so, he vanishes suddenly, like all the time!" - Manami "Manami, you look like an octopus!" - Komatsu "I've had... this condition lately, facial ticks..." - Manami

Here, the joke is partly in the usage of homonyms - "tako" can mean "a kite" on one hand, while its homonym can mean "an octopus."

Additionally, in Japanese comics, an octopus is always depicted to be pouting - this is because its siphon does look like a pouted lips, hence Komatsu's remark.

"N...NO!" - Yuusaku (as the electric cable he's holding breaks)

At the very end of 1st part of Episode 36, the following dialogue was edited from the final version.

(The scene: all the lights have gone out. everyone is panicking.)

Komatsu: "Wh...What the?!"

Hatta: "Get the emergency lights! The lights!"

Kurumi & Manami: "(Screams) Perverts!"

Hatta: "Hey, Komatsu! That's my butt!"

"I'm Asayami Sachi of Koryo Police School, 3-B! A.k.a... The Sukeban Officer! If you don't fear this police memo-pad of mine, come and challenge me!" - Hikaru

This is a parody of the live-action series called "Sukeban Officer," which was broadcast in the mid 80's. Due to its popularity, the series produced two sequels as well as a movie. "Asamiya Sachi" is a take on "Asamiya Saki," the main heroine of the first Sukeban series.

"That's a MATTRESS! I was talking about a MAT from the gym!" - Manami

Both a mattress ("mattoresu") and mat ("matto"), the kind used in gym, can be referred to as a "matto," hence the confusion.

"I'll be right there!" - Hatta

The exact Japanese phrase used here is "Chotto mattottene," which is a very informal way of saying "I'll be there in a sec." The phrase is deliberately written to work as a pun because of the word "matto" from above.

"Don't just say it's a sticky mess, Hatta!" - Komatsu
"But what can I do if it won't budge?" - Hatta

"Hatta" happens to be a homonym for "stuck" or "pasted."

"Heroic Orange Legend! Madoka's Duel in the Blizzard."

The Japanese phrase used in the title, "Ninkyooden," refers to those tales in which the hero saves the weak, helpless victims while bringing down the powerful aggressors - a common theme in samurai and yakuza flicks!

"A...Ayukawa! Let me go with you!" - Kyosuke
"No... Please don't accompany me. 'Tis a duel that must be woman to woman." - Madoka

The scene is a parody of mediocre samurai flicks (eg: the ones AnimEigo doesn't release) The speech manners, music and scenery are all too typical.

"What're you doing, loafing around?! Have you found Oryuu or what?!" - A-ko

"Oryuu" is a common ancient name for women that often turns up in samurai movies. In the script, "Oryuu" is written using the kanji for "dragon." "O-" is a typical, archaic prefix for female names.

"It's obvious you're trying to make Manami pity you!" - Hatta "What a pitiful punk you are!" - Hatta "You should talk! Go pet a loach or something!" - Komatsu

This sequence relies on a pun - "doojoo" means "sympathy," "pity," etc., while "dojoo" refers to a small eel-like fish (called a "loach" in English).

"We're twin bagworms." - Komatsu and Hatta

A bagworm ("minomushi") is the larva of Thyridopteryx Ephemeraeformis, a moth species that causes hefty damage to trees. During its larva stage, it forms its own 'sleeping bag' using plant materials and silk. The tubular bag grows as the larva grows.

"That Oryuu girl... I just heard she got snatched! Madoka! You're going to save her, aren't you?! Please take me with you!" - Yuusaku

Yuusaku's headband reads "Hisshou" or "Victory."

"To the construction site in Green-Ward! Floor it!" - Policeman
"Ushiko! Wherefore art thou, Ushiko?" - Umao
"Umao! And, wherefore art thou, Umao?" - Ushiko

Note here that Umao is playing a woman's role, while Ushiko's playing her male lover!

"Oryuu the 'Cup-n-Ball' Ace is a good-for-nothing now!" - A-ko

"Kendama" is the children's wooden toy seen here. It has a ball (with a hole in it) attached by a string to its wooden handle that has two 'cups' and a pointed tip at its end - the object is to place the ball on the cups or the tip. Seasoned players can do this very quickly, time after time.

It is a common motif that Sukeban girls all have their own special weapons. A-ko uses a skateboard, Madoka uses guitar picks, and in one episode, a chunky Sukeban uses bowling balls!

"Say, Kurumi... there'll be big fancy cakes with gadzillions of strawberries, canaps with ikura, roasted chicken legs... and it's all "All-U-Can-Eat!" - Komatsu

"Ikura" is salmon roe, somewhat like caviar.

"Yattana, Pureibooya!" ("Oh! You've done it, Playboy!") - Komatsu
"I had so many choices that I had a tough time choosin'!" - Kazuya

The romanization of "Playboy" is "Pureibooi," and Japanese word for "boy" is "booya," so "Pureibooya" works as a pun.

"I woke up to the sound of my stomach growling. The fact that I didn't have my First Dream of the New Year made me feel like I'd missed out on something big." - Kyosuke

Tradition has it that the content of the "hatsuyume," the dream one has before waking up on the New Year's Day, determines how the rest of the year will go.

"How about some Ozouni? Or some Otoso, perhaps? Please tell me how I may serve you, Master." - Madoka

"Ozouni" (a clear soup with mochi, or rice cake, inside) and "Otoso" (a drink consisting of Sake and Chinese herbal medicine, said to supposedly take care of illness for the rest of the year) are traditionally served during the New Year's week.

"Clearly, the Otoshidama is tempting but then, Ayukawa in a Bunny costume is not to be missed...!" - Kyosuke

On the New Year's Day, adults give Otoshidama to children - These are cash gifts sealed inside special envelopes.

"Oh, it looks so good! I'm such a sucker for Soba-noodles!" - Kyosuke

Soba-noodles are very thin buckwheat noodles which are almost always eaten by dipping them into a cup of sauce.

"This must be my first time... To be like this... To enjoy Toshikoshi Soba-noodles together with someone." - Madoka

Soba-noodles served on New Year's Eve are called "Toshikoshi" (literally "Crossing over the year"). Since soba are long, they symbolize longevity. Eating the toshikoshi soba is a traditional rite to wish longevity and good health.

"Say! Say, you, my New Year's Eve Girl! Wanna go do the Kanetsuki with me tonight?" - Komatsu
"And after the clang, let's cling!" - Hatta

"Kanetsuki" (literally "Ringing of bells") are just one of the New Year's Eve festivies that are celebrated at Buddhist shrines and temples.

The "tsuki" in "kanetsuki" comes from the verb "tsuku" which means "to hit," "to strike," etc., as in ringing the bell using a hammer. A homonym of "tsuku" means "to stick," "to unite," etc. - Hatta's implication here is that he wants to get intimate with the girl.

Hatta's line is a pun which relies on alliteration, which we tried to preserve in the process of translation!

"T.A.P. Gun! Witness a miracle, in the voices that sing!" - Narrator
"Finally Opens Today at Toho Theaters Nationwide! Toho Advance Tickets Selling Fast!"

This type of display is exactly what Toho uses in their theatrical trailers, and the narrator is Toho's regular trailer narrator!

"First Dream of the New Year! Jingoro the Giant Monster Strikes Back!"

The title is in reference to the second Godzilla movie (released 1955). Godzilla movies were among the earliest monster-genre films produced and distributed by Toho.

While Sagisu Shiroo, a popular composer/arranger who is credited with hundreds of hit records, supervised the music to KOR, this particular episode consists of music written by Ifukube Akira, a celebrated composer of soundtracks to many Toho monster films. Viewers may immediately recognize tunes from the first Godzilla movie.

Around the time the episode aired, an 8-volume CD set called "Ifukube Akira - Complete Collection - Toho Live Action" was being released by Toshiba EMI. Mr. Ifukube has been composing for films without interruption since the 1940's!

"In the days when creatures we now call "Monsters" were just beginning to surface..." - Caption

The Japanese caption is not the translated version of the English caption that is on-screen. Thus, our translation reads considerably different from it!

"If I could just get a snapshot of it and sell it to the tabloids... What a scoop it'll be! What a great deal!"- Hatta "You said it! You said it!" - Komatsu

The pun here is based on the two phrases: "toku-dane" = "special news item" "toku da ne" = "Isn't that a bargain/good deal, etc."

"All right, kids! You aren't supposed to fight! It's snack time now. Today, we're having powdered skim milk!" - Hikaru

General Macarthur visited Japan after the WWII and recommended that wheat flour and milk products be added to the diet of Japanese people (previously, their diet was limited mainly to seafood and vegetables). The US began donating flour and powdered skim milk in the late 40's, mainly to schools. UNICEF began similar efforts in the 50's, subsidizing lunch programs for millions of school children nationwide.

The downside to all these humanitarian efforts is that many schools could only offer essentially the same menu for students on everyday basis - Powdered skim milk, for instance. Hence the children's reaction in this scene!

"I'm sure that the Black Fighter will protect us all. Yes, Kyosuke... I know who you really are. The fact that you risk your life in your work, for our sakes... That must be your way of showing your love for us." - Hikaru

Aside from being a "Top Gun" parody, this episode also pays homage to "Tiger Mask," an anime show about a wrestler-in-disguise, which aired between 1969 and 1971. Kyosuke and Hikaru's roles, his car, the school - these are all references to this classic!

And believe it or not, Tiger Mask (the main character) was played by none other than Mr. Tomiyama, the voice of Mr. Kasuga!

"In preparation for the battle in our homeland, we at TAP HQ shall be calling the creature 'Monster G' from now on." - Takashi "Why not 'X,' 'Y' or 'Z?' Why 'G?'" - Kyosuke

"Monster G" is an obvious reference to Godzilla.

The White Hart Pub

This is a reference to Arthur C. Clarke's Tales from the White Hart stories.

"Dr. Yamane, a biologist, has made the following comments:"

Dr. Yamane was the biologist in the first Godzilla movie.

"How could a cat pop out of the sea?! A cat from the gulf? From the gulf comes a cat...? Oh! I get it! A SEAGULF!" - Takashi "Commander, we'll return to your tasteless jokes later..." - an officer

The original joke in Japanese is based on the words "umi" (sea, gulf, ocean, etc.) and "neko" (cat). "Umineko" refers to a seagull. We tried to render this dialogue in such a way to preserve Takashi's "tasteless" attempt at humor!

"Just sit, relax, and leave everything to me!" - Kyosuke "Dad! I'm gonna do it!" - Kyosuke "You weren't supposed to say that!" - Takashi

"Dad! I'm gonna do it!" is a classic line that comes from a 70's anime show - Kyojin no Hoshi. Most Japanese recognize the source, as the show (and its sequels and reruns) is immensely popular even to this day.

There is an added twist to this, since Mr. Furuya, the voice behind Kyosuke, was the voice actor who uttered this deathless line in the original series! For more about this show, refer to the Part 1 of our liner notes.

"Sure Death Technique: Super Dimensional Comet Pegasus Major League Attack #1!" - Kyosuke

The "technique" line refers to numerous anime shows, such as Kyojin no Hoshi and Gatchaman. Sometime during the early years of anime, it became a clich for the main characters to climatically exhibit (and explain!) his/her "hissatsu-waza" (sure-death technique) - and this is a dead-on parody of those lines.

"Oh! Shot down! A plane's been shot down! The leader of TAP GUN, the squad that creamed Yojira and Redon Captain Ayukawa Madoka has been shot down by Monster G!" - Announcer

"Yojira" and "Redon" are spoofs of "Gojira" (Godzilla) and "Radon" (for obvious reasons, it's spelled Rodan in the American release), respectively.

Trivia: "Radon" (or "Rodan the Flying Monster" as it's known in US), released on December 1956, was Toho's first monster movie shot in color.

"That's right! We terminate them. And you call us 'These kinda guys?!'" - Komatsu "So, okay, won't you, er, just a li'l..." - Hatta

The scene immediately following the above was cut from the final version.

Manami: Say, that man who's chatting with Master... Is it true that he's Captain Ayukawa's former lover?

Komatsu: Yup! Always count on me for such info! I'm not known as "Komatsu the Ear from Hell" for nothing! "The Black Fighter..." Nobody knows who he is exactly... All we know is that he's Japanese. He gets paid to fight the monsters... basically a professional monster-terminator... From what I hear, he's also popular with children. He was once a member of the American TAP Gun team too. Captain Ayukawa was also a member there, when she was in the States... so I'm sure that's where they met.

Kurumi & Manami (in unison): A-ha...

Kurumi: I wonder, how far did they go?

All (unison): ...uh-huh... WHAT?!

"Jingoro... Jingoro..." - Kurumi and Manami

The song comes straight from the movie, "Mothra," and the words (it is NOT Japanese!) are exactly the same, except for "Jingoro" being used in place of "Mosura" (the Japanese romanization for "Mothra").

Here are the actual words to "Mothra's Song"

Lyrics: Yuki Koji
Music: Koseki Yuji
Performed by: The Peanuts (Ito Emi & Ito Yumi)

Mosura ya mosura
Doungan kasakuyan
Indoumu
Rusuto uiraadoa
Hanba hanbaamuyan
Randabanunradan
Tounjukanraa
Kasakuyaanmu

"I cannot believe that he is the last of the Jingoro... Ha! I've always wanted to say that line!" - Takashi

This line comes from the ending of the first Godzilla movie. Toho likes it so much that when they built their theater park, they inscribed the words on a plaque underneath the commemorative statue of Godzilla that stands at its entrance!

"I ejected, just before impact. I... consider myself quite lucky." - Madoka

Careful viewers will notice a super-deformed Madoka (among other goodies!) appears for one frame at the moment her plane explodes.

"My! Ojiisama, Obaasama, long time no see!" - Hikaru

"Ojiisama" and "Obaasama" are semi-formal ways of referring to grandfather and grandmother, respectively. Even though Hikaru is not related, the terms can be used to refer to unrelated elderly persons, as in this case.

"This time, for sure!" - Hatta

The inscriptions on the score boards read:

"Kyosuke" "Baaroo" ("Bozo!")
"Hikaru-chan" (+ heart mark)

and

"Hatta" "erai" ("He's the man!")
"Kurumi-chan" (+ heart mark)

"Thanks to the mysterious watch, so far, I've been able to keep on racking up points." - Kyosuke

The writing on the score board says "Kuyapii" (somewhat like "Ooo, that makes me mad!" in a Hikaru-speak!) written by Kurumi.

"Oh, stand still, Time! You are too beautiful!" - Hatta

This phrase is an obscure reference to the 1973 movie, "Visions of Eight," a documentary about athletes competing in Munich. Its Japanese title is "Toki yo tomare, Kimi wa utsukushii - Myunhen no 17 nichi" (Time, be still, You're beautiful - 17 Days in Munich)

"Ayukawa, those actors... They're both women, right?" - Kyosuke "That's right." - Madoka "I thought so... This is the first time I've seen something like this..." - Kyosuke

This episode starts out with a parody of the Takarazuka Revue Company, an all-women theater troop, performing their version (which is itself a parody) of "Gone With The Wind."

Takarazuka actresses (who play both male and female roles) are superstars in Japan and many parts of Asia. Understandably, a large number of thier fans are teenage girls.

"Call me 'Don Gabacho.'" - Rhett "You mean, 'Don Quixote.'" - Scarlett

President Don Gabacho is one of the main characters from a long-running children's puppet show on NHK (a government-subsidized TV network, somewhat akin to PBS in the US) called "Hyokkori Hyoutan-Jima" (loosely translatable as "A Gourd-Island Out of Nowhere").

"Tara! Home... I'll go home... To eat Tara-Chiri, I'll go home!" - Scarlett

In "Gone With The Wind," Tara is the name of plantation where Scarlett O'Hara lives.

"Tara" in Japanese happens to be the name of a fish (codfish), hence the pun! "Chiri" is a kind of stew or soup, usually containing tofu or rice in addition to fish meat. Tara-chiri (or, more commonly, Tara-chiri-nabe, "nabe" referring to a cooking pot or bowl) is just that - a codfish stew, a popular dish in the wintertime!

"Pervert! Pervert! Oops, that's not right! Terrible! Terrible!" - Hikaru

Hikaru wanted to say "taihen" (something awful, emergency, etc.) but starts out by saying the 'reversed' phrase "hentai," which means pervert, lewd person, maniac, etc.

"You know? Ever seen it? The lovers who were never accepted by adults... They rode the trolley on a journey into a world of their own." - Sumire

The dialogue here is in reference to the movie "Melody" (1971), starring Mark Lester, with music by the Bee Gees. This British film was a blockbuster smash in Japan, leading to the creation of many knockoffs and stories based on a similar theme.

"I believe that those two lovers, who rode the trolley are living happily, even to this day." - Sumire

A comment such as this one - referring to the two kids in "Melody" - regularly pops up in Japanese mass media.

"What?! Sumire is eloping with Ayukawa?!" - Hatta "That's right, hon! I heard that they looked really happy, and were headed to a factory site!" - Komatsu "Girl, I'll be damned!" - Hatta

Here, the guys' speech manner is feminine and colloquial, somewhat stereotypical of housewives or "girlfriends" talking to each other!

"A-ha... A Music Festival, eh? So... you applied for it?" - Madoka
"I put Darling down as our leader." - Hikaru

Music festivals and band contests are very common (and often taken very seriously!) in Japan, especially among high school students. The reason for this is that many record company execs scout new talent at such events.

In fact, during the 80's, some of the most popular TV shows were band contests (ala Star Search), from which many of the biggest music acts' careers were launched.

"Hee Hee! That Kasuga! What's he done this time?!" - Hatta
"You guys!" - Kyosuke
"Don't hold it against me, Kasuga. It's all your own fault anyway! How sad!" - Komatsu

"Sabishii!" ("How sad!"), works as a pun in Japanese. A homonym of "sabi" appears in the phrase Komatsu uses just before - "...mi kara deta sabi..." (your own fault).

"The Pikkaru's 'brightly shine,' you see... Right!" - Hikaru
"Gosh... Sounds like a little league team, huh?" - Yuusaku

The band's name ("Pikkaru's") comes from the phrase "pikkari hikaru," which means "to shine brightly/dazzlingly."

Yuusaku is thinking of the "Bikkii's," a little league team from a successful 70's TV series called "Ganbare Red Bikkii's!" (loosely translatable to "Break a Leg, Red Bikkii's!"), created by Ishimori Shoutarou ("Cyborg 009," "Kamen Raidaa (Masked Rider)," etc.) A sequel called "Soreyuke Red Bikkii's" (Go for it, Red Bikkii's!) was made in the early 80's.

"Gosh, you're being too soft-hearted, Manami! You've got to stop giving out 'obligation chocolates!'" - Kurumi "What's wrong with that?! As they say, 'show your love to boys who need it!'" - Manami

There is a traditional chocolate-giving custom in Japan on Valentine's Day. Girls generally present chocolates of high-quality to boys that they feel very close to or have feelings for. They may also give mediocre kinds to other male friends with whom they do not maintain close relationship (ex. a female office clerk and a male supervisor), perhaps out of obligation. The latter kind is called "Giri-Choko" or "obligation chocolate."

"Here you go. It's your turn today, Sempai!" - Hikaru

"Koukan Nikki" refers to diaries that friends exchange; they take turns writing it.

"I can't believe you, Bro! You're so conceited!" - Kurumi

This is a colloquial phrase using a figure from Japanese folklore. "Tengu" is a winged creature (see another section) that is said to have a long, tall nose. Figuratively, the phrase refers to how somone looks down on others, or is simply "stuck up."

"I'm not feeling good today..." - Kyosuke

Notice all the black crows. Crows generally symbolize bad luck, ill omens, etc.

"And now, representing the friends of the deceased let us welcome an exceptionally close friend of hers..." - Matsuoka

The funeral scene that we see in this sequence (including the procession) is typical of those held for someone of high importance (celebrities, corporate VIP's, etc.)

"If we don't at least do that much, she'll ridicule us from above, as a star up in the heavens!" - Komatsu

A common legend (often told in children's stories) holds that a deceased soul becomes a star in the sky.

"We've gotta go look for a juku!" - Hatta

Many students attend juku (supplementary school) on weekends and after regular school hours. This is where students are taught advanced lessons, mainly to prepare for college entrance exams - or, in this case, senior high school entrance exams, since Hatta and the gang are still in junior high. There are even juku for pre-school children as well!

"There's a bright future, that's like "Yippee," in store for all of you! Chin up! Chin up!" - Hikaru

The following line by Hikaru was edited out from this scene in the final version.

Hikaru: "Master! Make us lots of food!"

"Before the end of the Seventh Day after her death you must dig a tunnel through that mountain!" - Grandpa (in disguise)

In Buddhism, upon death, a soul is said to cross the Sanzu River in the netherworlds. "Shonanoka" refers to the seventh day after death, when the guardians of Sanzu decide upon the fate of each soul.

"Chug! Chug! Chug!" - Guys

In recent years, many phrases that we hear in older anime, as innocent sounding as they are, have been banned from most TV networks.

The phrase "ikki" ("chug") is one example. A certain network decided that the phrase might promote alcoholism. This is one reason KOR may not ever be seen again in its entirety on Japanese TV!

"A straight descent!" - Hikaru
"A diagonal descent!" - Madoka
"Ha! Talk about looking indecent!" - Yuusaku

Puns are a nightmare for translators, since there are no good solutions most of the time! Here is one example that works out.

The three words used in this pun are: "chokkakkou," "shakakkou" and "bukakkou."

While the "-kakkou" in the first two words relate to "descent" as in downhill skiing, the one used in "bukakkou" is a homonym that means "appearance" (or how presentable or sightly something is).

Thus, "Chokkakkou" and "Shakakkou" are "straight descent" and "diagnal descent," respectively. We've chosen to rely on the homonym, "decent," to make the pun work!

"You know, I... l..." - Yuusaku "'l...?'" - Hikaru "...love your skiing." - Yuusaku

This hilarious sequence relies on the fact that the words for "to like/love" and "ski" sound alike ("suki" and "sukii," respectively). Yuusaku wants to tell her that he loves her, but in the end he wimps out!

"You're napping away, and it's only noon!" - Madoka
"That's why it's called a noontime nap!" - Kyosuke

The Japanese word for "nap" is "hirune," which is written using two kanji characters - "hiru" (daylight/noon) and "ne" (sleep), so it can literally mean "to take a nap at noon," hence the pun!

"Oh! I know! Lemme guess... Your first love!" - Kyosuke
"Bingo!" - Madoka
"Yeah! Bingo...! What?!" - Kyosuke

The phrase "pinpon!" (which we rendered as "Bingo!") that is heard here is yet another Japanese onomatopeia for the ringing of a bell (as in a quiz show, indicating that the correct answer was given).

"Six years ago... Six years ago... Six years ago..." - Kyosuke

"Six years ago" in the KOR TV universe refers to 1982 - the year the "Macross" TV series appeared, Phoebe Cates became an overnight sensation... and Spinal Tap toured the US and Japan...

"Huh?! What's with this 100 coin?! Look! It says "500" here! What a neat toy!" - cashier

Kyosuke "time-slipped" to the spring of 1982. The first 500 Yen coin was not issued until later that year.

"I Found Love - And, Repeat From Beginning."

The title contains the phrase "Da Capo," which is a music term that means "to repeat (playing) from the start of a score." While the phrase itself is a vernacular in Japan (since knowing such terms is a part of compulsory education!), the situation is slightly different here in the US - hence, the rendering of the phrase we've chosen.

"K...Komatsu and Hatta..." - Kyosuke
"No 'Mr.' or anything? You don't know me!" - Komatsu

"Yobisute" is an act of calling someone by his/her name only, i.e. without using any honorifics. It is commonly done among close friends and colleagues. Kyosuke, for example, calls Ayukawa this way. Notice how Hatta, Komatsu and Kyosuke always refer to themselves without an honorific, except in rare occasions (when they want special attention, for instance!).

Also, school teachers usually yobisute their students, as do corporate higher-ups addressing their subordinates.

At times, yobisute can be rather insulting - it's never done among strangers or those who do not have close relationship. This scene illustrates that point.

Production Staff

Japanese Production Staff

Original Story: Matsumoto Izumi
Serialized in: Shonen Jump Weekly (Shueisha)

Planning: Nunokawa Yuuji & Fujiwara Masamichi
Producers: Horikoshi Tooru (TV Japan), Koono Hideo (Toho) & Fukakusa Reiko (Pierrot)

Series Producer: Terada Kenji
Chief Animation Director: Gotoo Masako
Character Design: Takada Akemi
Art Direction: Kobayashi Shichiroo, Nakamura Michitaka & Miura Satoshi
Director of Photography: Kaneko Jin
Music Director: Matsuura Noriyoshi
Music: Sagisu Shiroo

Screenplay: Ohashi Shikichi, Shizutani Isao, Terada Kenji & Tomita Yoshihiro

Storyboards: Anno Takashi, Goo Mitsuru, Hiba Takayuki, Ikegami Kazuhiko, Ishii Fumiko, Matsuzono Koo, Morikawa Shigeru, Nakamura Kooichiroo, Nibayashi Minoru, Suda Yumiko, Mochizuki Tomomitsu, Uemura Osamu, Uemura Shuu & Yokoyama Hiroyuki

Casting: Anno Takashi, Goo Mitsuru, Hiba Takayuki, Matsuzono Koo, Morikawa Shigeru, Nakamura Kooichiroo, Nibayashi Minoru, Sasaki Kazuhiro, Suda Yumiko, Tamano Akemi, Kobayashi Kazuhiko, Mochizuki Tomomitsu, Suzuki Yoshio & Yokoyama Hiroyuki

Animation Direction: Gotoo Takayuki, Hayashi Keiko, Hayashi Takafumi, Kishi Fumiko, Omokuni Yuuji, Shindaiji Sanjuroo, Sugiyama Toyami, Takakura Yoshihiko, Tsugiyama Toyami, Watanabe Mayumi, Yahata Tadashi, Yanagida Yoshiaki & Chiaki Kooichi

Lead Animators: Kaname Productions, NVC, Oosaka Anime-R, Studio Core, Studio Dub, Studio Jungle Gym, Aisaka Kooji, Aoshika Nobuo, Bessho Takehito, Chiaki Yuri, Emura Toyoaki, Fukushima Toyoaki, Funakoshi Hideyuki, Furuizumi Kooji, Hanabusa Taido, Hara Hiroshi, Hashimoto Keiji, Hashimoto Shinji, Hattori Ichiroo, Hayashi Keiko, Hayashi Shizuka, Hayashi Yoshiko, Ichikawa Osamu, Iida Hiroyoshi, Iiji Tsuyoshi, Ijiri Hiroyuki, Ikeno Yuuko, Ishida Atsuko, Itojima Masahiko, Itoo Kazuo, Itoo Shuuichi, Iwamura Sachiko, Kanaza Katsunori, Kinoshita Yutaka, Kishi Fumiko, Kitakubo Hiroyuki, Kobayashi Kazuzoo, Koizumi Takashi, Komurakata Hiroharu, Koomori Takahiro, Koyanagi Nobuyuki, Kume Issei, Kume Kazunari, Masayuki, Matsumoto Fumio, Minowa Satoru, Miyazaki Kenji, Mori Ken, Morikawa Sadami, Motani Hitoshi, Murata Shunji, Murata Toshiharu, Nakamura Jun, Nakamura Keiji, Nakano Misao, Nakayama Katsuichi, Nishimura Seiho, Nishizawa Shin, Ogata Yuuji, Ohara Yasushi, Oohashi Toshimitsu, Oonishi Masaya, Ozeki Kazuhiko, Ozeki Noriko, Saito Shuuichi, Saito Takuya, Saito Tetsuhito, Sakamoto Hideaki, Sakuma Shinji, Sarada Kenji, Sasaki Kazuhiro, Sendao Shuuichi, Shimoda Masami, Suzuki Junpachi, Suzuki Reiko, Tanaka Ayako, Tanizawa Yasushi, Toda Shin'ichi, Tokura Norimoto, Tsunoda Katsutoshi, Uchida Emiko, Uchida Keiko, Utsuki Isamu, Watanabe Yoshimi, Yamada Kaoru, Yamamoto Naoko, Yanagisawa Masahide & Yotsuya Mitsuhiro

Publicity: Iwagami Kishin (Nihon TV)
Assistant Producer: Fukuyoo Masako
Music Production: Toho Music Publishing (Ooba Tatsuo) & Nihon TV Music
Photography: Tokyo Animation Film, Uehara Ichiroo, Komatsu Yoshikazu, Ozaki Miki, Okayasu Yukiko & Fukunaga Kenji
Editing: Kakesu Editing Room - Kakesu Shuuichi & Ishida Satoru
Sound Effects: Itoo Katsumi - Suwara Productions
Sound Recording: Ootsuka Harutoshi
Recorded at: Seion Studios
Assistant Music Director: Watanabe Jun
Sound Production: Gen
Developed at: Tokyo Developing Labs
Production Desk: Homma Michiyuki
Production Consultant: Shizutani Isao
Production Supervisor: Suzuki Yoshio
Production Coordinators: Aoki Kuniyuki, Nishimura Yoshihiro, Hayakawa Masahiko & Okada Ki'ichi
Planning: Nihon TV
Produced by: Toho Co Ltd. & Studio Pierrot
US Production Staff
Executive Producer: Robert J Woodhead
Translator: Shin Kurokawa
Dialogue Checker: Ueki Natsumi
Subtitling Director: Robert J Woodhead

Voice Actors



The Cast of the Kimagure Orange Road TV Series

Furuya Tooru as Kasuga Kyosuke

An A-list voice talent since his early teens, Mr. Furuya, born 1953, has lent his voice to countless TV documentaries, commercials, anime and video games. His other anime credits include "Kyojin no Hoshi" from the 60's, "Maruko Pooro no Bouken" ("The Adventures of Marco Polo") in the 70's, as well as the recent batch of "Sailor Moon" series. This versatile actor had even replaced the voice of Hollywood actor Rob Lowe in a movie dubbed in Japanese.

Tsuru Hiromi as Ayukawa Madoka

Ms. Tsuru, a veteran actress/voice talent, has worked on innumerable TV, anime and video game productions since the 70's. Anime fans recognize her voice in "Arcadia of My Youth," "Shonan Bakusozoku," "Gall Force," "Macross," "Sailor Moon," "Dragonball," and many, many more. Needless to say, with this kind of a track record, most mortal industry pro-fessionals know not to mess with she who was "Madoka the Pick!"

Hara Eriko as Hiyama Hikaru

Although Robert, our CEO, had to be carried to a hospital for psychosurgery after being exposed to one too many 90-decibel "Kyappii!" during the production of this set, everyone else at AnimEigo has always loved Ms. Hara's performance in all the KOR titles. Her portrayal of Hikaru in the KOR Movie is among the best in anime. Her long anime credits include roles in such famous titles as "Gundam," "Gall Force" and "Anpan Man." She is also featured in the "Sailor Moon" series.

Tomizawa Michie as Kasuga Manami

As one of the highly sought-after voice actresses in the industry, she has had leading roles in major productions such as "Bubblegum Crisis," "Gall Force," "Sailor Moon" and "Crayon Shinchan." Just like Manami in Eps.14, Ms. Tomizawa says she is a big fan of professional wrestling!

Honda Chieko as Kasuga Kurumi

Ms. Honda began her professional work as a radio and TV voice talent in the early 80's. She became one of the top voice actresses, having appeared in numerous successful anime productions, such as "Riding Bean," "Minky Momo," "Gundam," and "Silent Moebius." We can't list her entire resume because it's too darn long, and just when you think she has enough work lined up, she's also keeping busy performing with a group called "The Ripple."

Ogata Ken'ichi as the adorable but much-abused Jingoro the Cat

Mr. Ogata, born 1942, is a veteran voice talent, whose resume must be as thick as a telephone book, having worked on countless TV documentaries, movies and commercials over the years. In the anime world, he worked in numerous successful titles since the mid 70's, such as "Majokko Megu-Chan" ("Li'l Witch Meg"), "Uchuu Senkan Yamato" (Space Cruiser Yamato, a.k.a. "Star Blazers") and "Captain Future." Mr. Ogata delivers all his lines in Cattish, which is alas impenetrable even to the crack AnimEigo translation team (our attempt to entice an actual cat to provide translations failed). His other works include roles in "Bubblegum Crisis," "Urusei Yatsura" and "Captain Harlock." Yes, he was Dr. Raven in BGC, and Mr. Moroboshi in UY!

Kikuchi Masami as Hino Yuusaku

Mr. Kikuchi's voice acting resume includes dozens of popular anime titles, including "Gundam," "Sailor Moon" and "Chibi Marukochan." Fans will recognize his voice in our Must-See-If-You-Are- Really-An-Anime-Fan release, "Otaku no Video." His most famous role is perhaps that of Morisato Keiichi in "Ah! Megamisama!" ("Oh! My Goddess!")

Namba Keiichi as Komatsu Seiji, Kyosuke's perverted friend

Mr. Namba is a very versatile voice talent who had worked on countless movie and TV productions. His anime credits include roles in "Transformers," "Gundam" and "Dragon Quest," just to name a few (out of gadzillions!).

Tatsuta Naoki as Hatta Kazuya, Kyosuke's other perverted buddy

Mr. Tatsuta is another voice-acting veteran. His voice is featured in popular anime titles such as "Dragonball," "Dragon Quest" and "Dirty Pair."

Yara Yuusaku as Master

A popular personality in the voice acting industry, Mr. Yara has worked on such titles as "Bubblegum Crisis," "Gall Force" and "Dominion."

Sakamoto Chika as Kyosuke's telepathic cousin, Kazuya

Ms. Sakamoto had lent her voice to Japanese-dubbed versions of American productions such as "Back to the Future" and "Family Ties." In the anime world, her voice was featured in such titles such as "Gundam" and "Sailor Moon," but she is perhaps most well-known as the voice behind Mei in "Tonari no Totoro" ("My Neighbor Totoro"). She also provides several incidental voices in KOR.

Tomiyama Kei as Kasuga Takashi

As one of the top-guns in the voice acting industry, Mr. Tomiyama was featured in tons of productions since the 70's (sorry, we're running out of ways to say "really a lot of"!), such as "Ginga Tetsudoo 999" ("Galaxy Express 999") and "Uchuu Senkan Yamato." Fans will recognize his voice in many, many anime titles. In "Riding Bean," for instance, he plays the hilarious Inspector Percy.

Suzuki Katsumi as Umao, and Nakajima Chisato as Ushiko

While his lines in KOR are very short, Mr. Suzuki has been in the voice acting profession for a very long time. He has had roles in other popular anime such as "Gall Force," "Bubblegum Crisis," "Macross" and "Kinnikuman" ("Muscleman"). Ms. Nakajima has had numerous small on-screen roles, in anime and video games. She has had roles in such titles as "Bubblegum Crisis" and "Kinnikuman" ("Muscle Man").

Shiozawa Kaneto as Matsuoka-sensei

Although he has a minor role in KOR, Mr. Shiozawa's resume reads like an encyclopedia. He had roles in "Bubblegum Crisis," "Vampire Princess Miyu," "Rupan III," "Shonan Bakusoozoku," "Transformers," "Crayon Shinchan," "Dragonball" and "Sailor Moon," just to name a few.

Shoo Mayumi: Aside from several incidentals, Ms. Shoo plays Oda Kumiko in Episode 21, "Kyosuke Thrown into a Pinch! Sweet Soft Nothings at the Wuthering Heights." Among others, she was featured in "Bubblegum Crisis," "Rupan III," "Vampire Princess Miyu" and "Gallforce."

Hayami Shoo: Mr. Hayami plays Kyosuke's "Beautiful" sempai, Kitakata, in Episode 20, "Hikaru Witnesses! Camp is Full of Dangers," and several incidentals. Not only a popular voice actor, he is one of the top anime singers in the business. He has had roles in "Dragonball," "Macross," "Orguss," "Transformers," and many, many others. In the KOR Movie, he makes a cameo appearance as the director of a musical troupe Hikaru tries out for.

Toda Keiko: This popular TV actress, who recently received the Japanese Academy Award's Best Supporting Actress Award, lent her voice to many Japanese-dubbed Hollywood movies as well as countless anime features since the early 80's. Some of the titles she worked in are "Anpan-Man" (in which she plays the main character of the same name), "Gundam," "Rupan III," "Hello Kitty" and "Majo no Takkyuubin" (affectionately known by anime fans as "Kiki's Delivery Service"). She even plays Sculley in the Japanese-dubbed version of the X-Files!

In KOR, she plays Yukari, the lead vocalist of the group, Swingtop, in Episode 22, "An Adult Relationship?! Madoka Secretly Returns Home in the Morning." Shin loves to boast the fact that he shares the same birthday. Robert likes to reply "Dream on, Shin-chan."

Ookura Masaaki: He plays Madoka's cousin, Shuuichi, in Episode 22, and has also appeared in "Bubblegum Crisis," "Perfect Blue," "Slayers," among others.

Kobayashi Michitaka: Several incidentals in KOR, such as the "surfer guy," and Komatsu's brother. Some of his other credits include "Riding Bean" and multiple roles in the "Bubblegum Crisis" series.

Yamada Eiko: Played the wrestling trainer in KOR. Her anime credits include "Akage no An" ("Anne of Green Gables") and "Sailor Moon."

Takamori Yoshino: Plays several "high school girls" in KOR. She has appeared in popular titles as "Crayon Shinchan," and in "Bubblegum Crisis," she played Sylvie. She is perhaps best known as the voice of Nadia in "Fushigi no Umi no Nadia" (commonly known as "Secret of the Blue Water").

Hamura Kyoko: Also plays several incidentals - including a "high school girl" and an "old woman." Her anime credits include "Bubblegum Crisis" and "Piitaa Pan no Bouken" ("The Adventures of Peter Pan").

Kitoo Satoko: She plays several "high school girls" throughout the KOR series. Her other anime roles include those in "Yamato Takeru" and "Maison Ikkoku."

Minaguchi Yuuko: Her most well-known characters are in "Dr. Slump," "Anpan-Man" and "Dragonball." She plays one of the high school students in KOR.

Yamaguchi Ken: Mr. Yamaguchi's credits include "Dragon Quest" and "Project A-Ko." He plays a small incidental role (a high school guy) in KOR.

Tanaka Kazumi: He also has a one-liner as one of the high school guys. Mr. Tanaka had roles in "Riding Bean," "Dagger of Kamui" and "Akira."

Ando Arisa: Her credits include "Iczer-1" and "Hokuto no Ken" ("Fist of the North Star"). She plays a mother in Episode 3.

Itoo Miki: She has played several roles in "Bubblegum Crisis," "Ah! Megami-sama," and "Gall Force." In Episode 3, she plays a burgershop clerk.

Sawaki Ikuya: The "old man" whose behind gets caned in episode 5 is played by Mr. Sawaki, whose anime credits include roles in "Spirit of Wonder," "Bubblegum Crisis" and "Dirty Pair."

Kawashima Chiyoko: Hikaru's mother is played by Ms. Kawashima, who had various roles in "Sailor Moon," "Captain Harlock" and "Gall Force."

Sasaki Nozomu: Mr. Sasaki plays one of the high school students, and perhaps other uncredited incidental roles. He is a popular voice actor and singer with a long list of credits, including Mackie Stingray in "Bubblegum Crisis."

Ootaki Shinya: Also from the BGC posse is Mr. Ootaki, who plays Sabu in Episode 9.

Sakakibara Yoshiko: Playing Madoka's mother is a veteran voice actress who can be heard on dozens of anime titles, including "Bubblegum Crisis," in which she plays Sylia Stingray.

Suzuki Reiko as Grandma, Ogata Ken'ichi as Grandpa

As a veteran voice actress, Ms. Suzuki's credits are incredibly long. Producers of "Ranma 1/2," "Totoro," "Fist of the North Star," "City Hunter" and "Minky Momo" have always depended on her gentle "grandma" voice.

Mr. Ogata, who plays Jingoro, also plays Kyosuke's grandfather (uncredited!). Careful listening reveals that he plays several incidental voices throughout KOR as well. See the Part 1 liner notes for more information.

Shioya Yoku as Young Takashi

Mr. Shioya's acting career began in the early 70's, and he lent his voice to many popular shows from that era, such as "Umi no Triton" (Triton of the Sea), "Gatchaman," "Mirai-Shoonen Conan" (Futureboy Conan). He is also featured in many popular titles as "Fire Tripper" (from Rumik World), "Green Legend Ran" and "Sailor Moon."

Kawashima Chiyoko as Hikaru's Mother

Although she had only few lines in KOR, Ms. Kawashima has had regular roles in a variety of anime series from the 70's on. Some of these titles include "Sailor Moon," "Please Save My Earth," "Captain Harlock" and "Saint Seiya."

Takada Yumi & Kawamura Maria - various roles

Some of the incidentals (high school students, sukeban girls, etc.) are done by Ms.Takada ("Crayon Shinchan," "Tenchi Muyu," "Orguss") and Ms. Kawamura ("Gallforce," "Megazone 23," "Yuuyuu Hakusho," "Compiler"), two of the most popular actresses in the industry.

Itoo Miki, Takano Urara - more sukeban roles

Ms. Itoo plays the sukeban gangleader "Yoko from Minato" in Episode 27. In addition to credits listed in Part 1, she has had roles in "Sailor Moon," "Rayearth" and "Project A-Ko."

Ms. Takano plays another sukeban in the same episode. Her voice is recognizable in such anime titles as "Bubblegum Crisis and "Saber Marionette," where she plays many supporting roles. Like many popular voice talents, she has recorded for countless video games and CD's.

Yamadera Kouichi as A Police Officer

Mr. Yamadera makes a cameo appearance in Episode 37 as one of the police officers who are after the furyoo girls. He has had countless roles in shows like "City Hunter," "Evangelion," "Ranma 1/2," "Pocket Monster" and "Compiler."

Yamamoto Yuriko as Hoshi Sumire

Making a guest appearance on KOR as Hoshi Sumire, a starry-eyed girl infatuated with Madoka, is this popular actress who has had regular leading roles in shows such as Iczer-1, Dancouger and Gallforce. Ms.Yamamoto was also featured in anime movies such as Dagger of Kamui and Arcadia of My Youth.

Tobita Norio as Hayami Jun

Mr.Tobita is a regular from numerous popular shows including , "Gundam," "Megazone 23," "Saber Marionette," "Otaku no Video" and "Chibi Maruko-Chan."

Yamada Eiko as Oryuu and Yukari

Ms. Yamada's credits include "Ranma 1/2," "Akage no An" (Anne of Green Gables), "Utsunomiko" and "Luna Varga." She plays Madoka's furyoo friend Oryuu, as well as Yukari in the part 2 of KOR TV Set.

Song Lyrics

Opening Theme: Night of Summerside
Lyrics: Urino Masao * Music: NOBODY * Arrangement: Shinkawa Hiroshi
Performed by Ikeda Masanori (Courtesy of Toshiba EMI)
Akuseru no himei sa, kishimu taia kara
Mishiranu kimi (onna) nose
tobidashita kuupe.
Oikakeru kage wo furikiri doa shimeta
Kimi wa "Dokodemo iikara hashitte!" to.

Deai wa haiuei jankushon.
Minato ga mieru koro
koi ni ochita to kizuita.
"Take me to Summer Side"
Kuchizuke yori
yasashisa ga hoshii to...
"Night of Summer Side"
...adokenasa de kaku(kyohi)shita
hitomi wa otona dattane.
"Take me to Summer Side"
Sabishisa yori
kuchizuke ga hoshii to...
"Night of Summer Side"
...furikaetta kimi no manazashi wa
otona dattane.
That's the accelerator screamin', as the tires
are squealin', takin' you along, a girl I hardly
knew, in my speedin' coupe.
You slammed the door, evadin' the shadows
that followed, sayin' "Take me anywhere,
Just go!"
An encounter is like a highway junction;
I've fallen in love with you - that I realized
by the time the seaport was in sight.
"Take me to Summer Side"
Sayin' that you desire tenderness
over a caress...
"Night of Summer Side"
...the way you avoided me, usin' that
nave look, wasn't so innocent.
"Take me to Summer Side"
Sayin' that you desire a caress
over loneliness...
"Night of Summer Side"
...the way you looked into my eyes as
you turned back wasn't so innocent.

Opening Theme: Orange Mystery
Lyrics: Urino Masao * Music: NOBODY * Arrangement: Sagisu Shiro
Performed by Nagashima Hideyuki (Courtesy of Toshiba EMI)
Kirameku umi e T-shatsu no mama
Kimi wa tondane kisu wo yokeru youni.

Nureta sukaato no shiroi hanabira
Aoi minomo ni hirogattekuyo.

Katame tojite boku no mono ni
Natteageru to ittanoni...
"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
Kimagure dane...
"Tell me you love me,
Tell me that you need me..."
"Tell Me, Tell Me" ...Natsu no tenshi.
"Tell me, lover, Tell me that you love me..."
"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
Koi wo shiteru
"Tell me you love me,
Tell me that you need me..."
"Tell Me, Tell Me" ...Kimi wa misuterii.

Natsu ga owareba sayonarayotte.

Itazurappoku boku wo mitsumeta ne.
Nagisa ni taoshita baiku ni utsuru
sora ni ochiteku kimi no namida.

Wakaranai ne kimitte ko wa.
Yasashisa dake ja shibarenai.

"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
Kimagure dane...
"Tell me, Lover, Tell me that you need me."
"Tell me, Tell me..." Kimi ga sukisa...
"Tell me, lover, Tell me that you love me..."
"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
Chikazuku hodo...
"Tell me, Lover, Tell me that you need me."
"Tell Me, Tell Me" ...Kimi wa misuterii.
"Tell me, lover, Tell me that you love me..."
As I tried to kiss you, as if to avoid me,
with your T-Shirt on, you dove
into the shining sea.
The white flower petals on your soaking skirt
spread open upon the surface
of the blue water.
Tell me why, when you winked,
to tell me that you'll be mine...
"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
You're unpredictable...
"Tell me you love me,
Tell me that you need me..."
"Tell Me, Tell Me" ...my Angel of the Summer.
"Tell me, lover, Tell me that you love me..."
"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
I know that you're in love...
"Tell me you love me,
Tell me that you need me..."
"Tell Me, Tell Me" ...but you're a mystery.

"When the summer ends,
it'll be over between us..."
You looked into my eyes as if to trick me.
The tears are falling on the reflected sky that
shines on the bike lying down by the beach.

I just can't seem to figure you out...
Why can't I hold you down with my tenderness alone?

"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
You're unpredictable...
"Tell me, Lover, Tell me that you need me."
"Tell me, Tell me..." I'm in love with you...
"Tell me, lover, Tell me that you love me..."
"Oh Baby, Tell Me, Tell Me"
...more and more, the closer I get to you...
"Tell me, Lover, Tell me that you need me."
"Tell Me, Tell Me" ...but you're a mystery.
"Tell me, lover, Tell me that you love me..."

Opening Theme: Kagami no Naka no Actress Actress in a Mirror
Lyrics & Music: Nakahara Meiko * Arrangement: Nishidaira Akira
Performed by Nakahara Meiko (Courtesy of Toshiba EMI)
Itsumo nara anata to sideseat de
kuruma o suberasu precious night.
Cancel no denwa ni uso no nioi.
Kizukanu furi de kitta wa.

Kawaita ato no manicure no iro.
Munashiku yoru o kazaru dake.

A-HA-HA...
Kagami no naka no actress.
Hakkiri ieba ii no ni
tamerai ga mimi moto de sasayaku.

"'Cause I love you..."
Kagami no naka no actress.
Enjiru tabi ni sugao ga
hanareteyuku.

"You've broken my heart."

A-HA-HA...
Kagami no naka no actress.
Isso naketara ii no ni
tsuyogari ga serifu o kaeteyuku.

"'Cause I love you..."
Kagami no naka no actress.
Tsumi no fukasa ni kizuite
modorenai wa.

"You've broken my heart."
Usually, I spend precious nights sitting
beside you as you drive along.
Your cancellation call smelled of a lie.
I hung up, pretending not to notice.

My manicure, now dried, is going to waste;
its color will just decorate the night.

A-HA-HA...
I'm the actress in the mirror.
Though I should say what I really feel,
hesitation whispers in my ear.

"'Cause I love you..."
I'm the actress in the mirror.
The more I put on an act, the
further away I get from my true self.

"You've broken my heart."

A-HA-HA...
I'm the actress in the mirror.
I wish I could bring myself to cry, but I
change what I say to fit my tough act.

"'Cause I love you..."
I'm the actress in the mirror.
I've realized my tragic mistake,
yet I cannot return.

"You've broken my heart."

Ending Theme: Natsu no Mirage (Summer Mirage)
Lyrics: Yukawa Reiko * Music: Tsukasa * Arrangement: Sagisu Shiroo
Performed by Wada Kanako (Courtesy of Toshiba EMI)
Asobigokoro ni jumon furikakete
Muchuu ni sasetai, anata no kokoro wo.
Koi wa de-javuu mishiranu omoide.
Kasanaru kuchibiru kanjiteruwa.
Love Me tendarii
Kin'iro no natsu no miraaju(shinkirou).
Some Day - Some Day
Suhada ni kuchizukete douzo
koibito to yobareru asa ni.
Some Day - Some Day
Itsumademo matteirunoyo.
I dream of casting a spell that captures your
heart and makes you crazy about me.
Love is dj vu; an unfamiliar memory.
I feel our lips pressing together.
Love me... tenderly...
Golden Summer Mirage...
Someday... Someday...
Please let my body feel your lips
on that morning I'll be called your lover.
Someday, someday...
I'll be waiting for that moment.

Ending Theme: Fire Love - Kanashii Heart wa Moeteiru (Fire Love - My Sad Heart is Burning)
Lyrics: Matsumoto Kazuki * Music: Inoue Daisuke
Arrangement: Shinkawa Hiroshi * Performed by Wada Kanako (Courtesy of Toshiba EMI)
Kanashii haato wa moeteiruwa.
"natsu ni hajimari"
Daite daite daite fire love.
"aki ni moetsuki"
Kanashii haato wa moeteiruwa.
"fuyu ni kareteku"
Yakete yakete yakete fire love.
Saigo no doraibu no yoru ni
yosoyuki no koewasure.
Sayonara o itta suiheisen mitsumete.
Kisetsu de kawaru hittokyoku
nareteyukutabi akiru.
Anata no yokogao sou itteru.
Honmei matteru anata no heya.
Kizukunoga ososugita anohi no telephone.

Kanashii haato wa moeteiruwa.
"natsu ni hajimari"
Daite daite daite fire love.
"aki ni moetsuki"
Kanashii haato wa moeteiruwa.
"fuyu ni kareteku"
Yakete yakete yakete fire love.
Omoide no anata keshite
"Stop, Stop, Stop."
Broken Heart is in Flames.
"It began in the summer..."
Hold me, Hold me, Hold me, Fire Love.
"It burnt up in the fall..."
Broken Heart is in Flames.
"It's withering in the winter..."
Flare, Flare, Flare like the Sun, Fire Love...
On that last night we went out for a drive,
I left my go-out voice behind.
As we watched the horizon, I said good-bye.
Like seasons, hit songs come and go. As
you get used to one, you're tired of it...
That's what's written on your profile.
You were waiting for the lucky star in
your room; I was too late to notice
it in that one phone call that day.
Broken Heart is in Flames.
"It began in the summer..."
Hold me, Hold me, Hold me, Fire Love.
"It burnt up in the fall..."
Broken Heart is in Flames.
"It's withering in the winter..."
Flare, Flare, Flare like the Sun, Fire Love...
Erase the memory of you from me...
"Stop, Stop, Stop."

Ending Theme: Dance in the Memories
Lyrics & Music: Nakahara Meiko * Arrangement: Nishihira Akira
Performed by Nakahara Meiko (Courtesy of Toshiba EMI)
I just dance in the sweet memories"
(Sweet memories)

Yuki ga odoru 'form e
iki o kirashite kaketekuru.
Tooi hi no station.

Aenai hibi ga shashin no yoo ni
anata o hohoemi ni kaeta no.


"I just dance in the sweet memories"
Kizutsuite aishikata o...
"I just dance in the sweet memories"
...oboeteyuku no ne.

"I just dance in the sweet memories"
(He's my one and only; you never can tell)
"I just dance in the sweet memories"
(Sweet memories)
"I just dance in the sweet memories"
"I just dance in the sweet memories"
(Sweet memories)

At a train station on a faraway day,
snowflakes dance on the platform, and
you came running, out of breath.

The days we've been apart changed
my memories of you to ones full of
smiles, like seeing pictures of you.

"I just dance in the sweet memories"
Each time we're hurt we learn...
"I just dance in the sweet memories"
...what it takes to love someone.

"I just dance in the sweet memories"
(He's my one and only; you never can tell)
"I just dance in the sweet memories"
(Sweet memories)
"I just dance in the sweet memories"

Furimuite My Darling (Turn Back My Darling)
Lyrics: Sawachi Takashi * Music and Arrangement: Sagisu Shirou
Performed by Fujishiro Minako
Turn Back, My Darling.
I love you so... love me too.
Akkerakanto anata
totte oki no shisen de
Hoka no ko homeru nante
chotto yurusenaiwa.
Sekkyokuteki ni watashi
toppyoushi mo nai hodo
oogesa na appiiru de shikkari aishichau.
Gaadoreiru wazato furatsuite.

Katate wo sashinobeta tsunawatari.

Darling I need you Darling I want you.
Love me and hold me tight.
Haru demo natsu demo
suki... Daisuki.
Aki demo fuyu demo
Itsumo
Tokubetsu na ai wo ageru.
Asa demo yoru demo suki
Daisuki.
Itsudemo dokodemo... nee
Furimuite My Darling.
Turn Back, My Darling.
I love you so... Love me too.
There you are with that look of yours,
looking dumbfounded...
How dare you compliment other
girls, I can't forgive you.
I'm gonna seduce you aggressively
like there's no tomorrow
to love you without any doubts.
You staggered along by the
guardrail on purpose...
You're walking on a tightrope
with one arm stretched out...
Darling, I need you. Darling, I want you.
Love me and hold me tight.
In the Spring or the Summer,
I will love you. "I love you."
In Autumn or Winter...
Anytime...
I'll give you my special love, just for you.
In the morning or at night,
I will love you.
I love you. Anytime, anywhere... OK?
Turn Back, My Darling.

Salvia no hana no you ni (Like A Sage Flower)
Lyrics: Yukawa Reiko * Music: Oda Yuuichirou * Arrangement: Irie Jun
Performed by Wada Kanako
Kuchibiru hitotsu ugokasudake de ai ga
furimuku nara, anata no kokoro ni
kotoba no tsubute nagete dakishimeruwa.
Tashikameruhodo setsunai mune no itami
wo; kakushite sotto hohoemu no negai
komete.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
Aisareru yori aishita hou ga
shinjitsu dakara.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
Atsui namida o anata ni ageru.
"You Are Everything To Me."
Anata no shisen tadotteyuku tabi soko ni
hoka no hito ga kokoro no mizuumi.
Kanashii kage utsushite namidatsukedo.
Toikakeru tabi kotaeru yasashii koe ga
kikoeru basho ni iraretara,
sore de ii no.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
Tsumetai kaze ni Salvia no hana
yureteru you ni...
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
...anata no soba de saiteitaino
"You Are Everything To Me."
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
Aisareru yori aishita hou ga shinjitsu dakara.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
Atsui namida o anata ni ageru.
"You Are Everything To Me."
If a mere whisper is all it takes to turn your
love around, I'd throw pebbles of words
into your heart to hold you tight.
My heart feels more pain the more I examine
it; I smile softly to hide it as I make a wish.

"Broken Heart to Dream..."
To love is more sincere
than to be loved.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
My tears of passion I dedicate to you...
"You Are Everything To Me."
Each time I follow your eyes I find there
awaits someone else. A sad shadow reflects
on the ripples of the lake inside your heart.
If I could be where a tender voice is always
there for me every time I seek it,
that's all I could wish for.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
Like the Salvia Flower that stands
against the cold breeze...
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
...I want to grow by your side.
"You Are Everything To Me..."
"Broken Heart To Dream..."
To love is more sincere than to be loved.
"Broken Heart to Dream..."
My tears of passion I dedicate to you.
"You Are Everything To Me."
AttachmentSize
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series General Liner Notes (PDF)123.79 KB
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series Disc 1 Liner Notes (PDF)56.53 KB
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series Disc 2 Liner Notes (PDF)43.27 KB
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series Disc 3 Liner Notes (PDF)43.08 KB
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series Disc 4 Liner Notes (PDF)57.43 KB
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series Disc 5 Liner Notes (PDF)56.32 KB
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series Disc 6 Liner Notes (PDF)57.32 KB
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series Disc 7 Liner Notes (PDF)56.02 KB
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series Disc 8 Liner Notes (PDF)50.57 KB
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series Disc 9 Liner Notes (PDF)59.46 KB
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series Disc 10 Liner Notes (PDF)73.6 KB
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series Disc 11 Liner Notes (PDF)49.26 KB
Kimagure Orange Road TV Series Disc 12 Liner Notes (PDF)50.43 KB